Lessons learned in Icelandic crisis

November 24, 2008,

A city council finance chief has admitted people have questioned their own roles in the Icelandic bank saga which has seen £42m of council cash frozen overseas.

John Beevers, head of financial projects at Nottingham City Council, said lessons are being learned about credit ratings after the authority ploughed vast sums of money into Landsbanki, Glitnir and Heritable just months before they ran into trouble.

Mr Beevers told the council’s Overview and Scrutiny Committee: “It [the Icelandic banks crisis] has provided more focus around the impact of credit ratings and what they show and whether they have been sufficient.

“There is a number of people that, as things come out, are looking at whether their role in it has been appropriate.

“I think we are taking on board the lessons we are learning.”

He also said there had been changes in some of the banks’ credit ratings around the time the investments were made.

“There had been some negative rating outlook changes on some of the banks,” he told the meeting. “That has not developed through to a complete meltdown of the bank itself.”

He later added: “Our actions are reinforced by over 100 other institutions. If the message were so loud and clear we would have been a number of two or three.”

The meeting heard the council was continuing to use the same credit rating agency, Butlers.

Deputy chief executive Carole Mills-Evans said an update on recovering the money was expected in the next “couple of weeks”.

She claimed that it would have been “almost impossible” for the council to get its money back before the end of its agreement with the banks.

“There is some talk that some councils have exit clauses. We have yet to find one council that that applies to.”

Source


UK anti terror laws right move against Icelandic banks?

“Not all conversations concerning this matter have been made public . . . When the matter is investigated, other conversations will have to be made public. I am aware of what they are about and I am aware of what in fact determined the position of the UK authorities,” the Financial Times quotes Icelandic central bank chairman David Oddsson as saying.

The implication, the article continues, is that the UK was right to use anti terror laws to freeze Icelandic assets at the beginning of the banking crisis in October. Furthermore, the FT states that any such revelations could damage any potential lawsuit filed against the British government by Reykjavik. The Icelandic government has hired Lovells, a UK law firm to investigate whether London acted illegally and significantly and unnecessarily worsened the economic crisis already unfolding.

Oddsson’s comments were made during a speech to the Iceland Chamber of Commerce late last week. As a former long-standing Prime Minister, current head of the central bank and prominent Independence Party figure, Oddsson is seen as a close ally of PM Geir Haarde, who once served as his minister of finance.

Oddsson and Haarde, among others, are credited with liberalising the Icelandic financial sector and also blamed by many for allowing the current crisis to unfold. As many as 90 percent of people now want Oddsson replaced, and a Frettabladid poll this weekend revealed that 70 percent of respondents no longer support the current government.

David Oddsson protests his innocence however; stating in his speech that he had been warning the government on the state of the banks for 18 months and was repeatedly ignored.

He also described the inquiry recently announced by the government as “a whitewash”.

“The investigation . . . is in all respects unsuitable and insufficient. It is almost laughable to see the posturing in the entire organised propaganda campaign which has been carried out by those who bear the prime responsibility,” he said.

Source

Related

Who Could Have Predicted Revolution in Iceland?

Iceland’s Economic Meltdown is a big Flashing Warning Sign


Iceland isn’t the only one needing help: Point of Interest.

The United States has asked four oil-rich Gulf states for close to 300 billion dollars to help it curb the global financial meltdown, Kuwait’s daily Al-Seyassah reported Thursday.

Quoting “highly informed” sources, the daily said Washington has asked Saudi Arabia for 120 billion dollars, the United Arab Emirates for 70 billion dollars, Qatar for 60 billion dollars and was seeking 40 billion dollars from Kuwait…….

Seems Because of Capitalism we have a planet full of beggars.

The lesson to be learned from all of this is “Capitalism” SUCKS.

Simple and to the point.

A Lesson the Entire would should have learned by now.

Published in: on November 25, 2008 at 3:13 am  Comments Off on Lessons learned in Icelandic crisis  
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