Occupy Wall Street Updates

Over 4,000 have been arrested to date.

Police brutality is growing.

Police Evicted from Occupy UC Davis after Pepper Spraying Peaceful Protesters

November 18 3011

If you haven’t seen this video yet from yesterday’s police action at Occupy UC Davis, you have to watch it, and watch it through the end. Honestly… it brought tears to my eyes. Tears of joy.

It starts with a group of students quietly and peaceful sitting on the ground and linking arms as they are viciously pepper sprayed by UC Davis police… officers whose job it is to protect them. You can’t see from this video, but reports and photos from the campus newspaper, the California Aggie, show that the students were sitting in a circle around a small group of tents at an encampment in the university quad.

The attack on the students is provoked by nothing except their refusal to obey police orders. The usual chaos ensues for a few minutes. Victims shriek in pain, while some in the crowd frantically search for water. Several of the protesters are cuffed and dragged away, rather than receiving the medical attention they need. It is outrageous. It is unforgivable. And then something amazing happens.

The remaining students, who far outnumber the contingent of police, slowly start to encircle the officers while chanting “Shame on you!” The chants get louder and more menacing as the crowd gets closer, herding the police into a defensive huddle. Officers raise their weapons toward the crowd, warning them to back off, but at this distance and in these numbers, their riot gear would offer them little protection should the crowd suddenly charge. Sensing their advantage, the students change their chant to the more defiant “Whose university? Our university!” Tensions rise. One twitchy trigger finger and anything could happen. Then a lone voice initiates the familiar call and response of the human mic:

Voice: “Mic check!”
Crowd: “Mic check!”

Voice: “We are willing…”
Crowd: “We are willing…”

Voice: “To give you a brief moment…”
Crowd: “To give you a brief moment…”

Voice: “Of peace…”
Crowd: “Of peace…”

Voice: “In order to take your weapons…”
Crowd: “In order to take your weapons…”

Voice: “And your friends…”
Crowd: “And your friends…”

Voice: “And go.”
Crowd: “And go.”

Voice: “Please do not return…”
Crowd: “Please do not return…”

Voice: “We are giving you a moment of peace.”
Crowd: “We are giving you a moment of peace.”

The crowd then starts chanting “You can go! You can go!”, and after a few moments the police turn their backs to the crowd and do exactly that, wisely taking advantage of the offered truce, and eliciting cheers and applause from the crowd.

Two quick observations. First, anybody who defends the use of pepper spray in situations like this is not only defending police brutality, but clearly advocating for the incitement of violence. Everybody involved, the officers and the students, are fortunate that the crowd showed such admirable restraint.

Second, anybody who still dismisses civil disobedience of this sort—resisting the removal of illegal encampments—as either inappropriate or counterproductive to the message and aims of the Occupy movement, has their head stuck thoroughly up their ass. This is what democracy looks like. Source

Scott Olsen suffered a skull fracture during tear-gas filled clashes between police and demonstrators on Oct. 25. Dottie Guy of Iraq Veterans Against the War said Sunday that Olsen was released last week. She says he can now read and write, but still has trouble talking.

Scott Olsen, Iraq War Veteran Hurt In Occupy Oakland Protests

Police Brutality

Health Hazards of Pepper Spray

A protester is arrested by Los Angeles Police Department officers after he attempted to join a group of Occupy LA demonstrators occupying a park in front of the Bank of America building, November 17, 2011 in downtown Los Angeles. Several dozen were arrested by the LAPD after marching through downtown. (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

For more photo’s and information go to the link below. They have over 50 photo’s to date.

OWS protesters call police tactics “excessive”

Retired Captain Ray Lewis of the Philadelphia police has joined Occupy Wall Street and gives his perspective on the general police mentality.

OWS video: NYPD arrest Philly police retired captain Raymond Lewis


Seattle activist Dorli Rainey, 84, reacts after being hit with pepper spray
during an Occupy Seattle protest on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 at Westlake
Park in Seattle. Protesters gathered in the intersection of 5th Avenue and
Pine Street after marching from their camp at Seattle Central Community
College in support of Occupy Wall Street. Many refused to move from the
intersection after being ordered by police. Police then began spraying pepper
spray into the gathered crowd
hitting dozens of people. (AP Photo/seattlepi.com, Joshua Trujillo)
Dorli Rainey has a few things to say. Check link below

84-year-old: subdued with pepper spray, overwhelmed by attention

More Photo's HERE

Oakland Cops Beat Iraq war veteran Kayvan Sabehgi

Protester and three-tour American veteran Kayvan Sabehgi was beaten by Oakland police during the Occupy protest’s general strike on 2 November. Sabehgi, who was ‘completely peaceful’, according to witnesses, was left with a lacerated spleen. It is all too obvious the police attacked him. Sabehgi, 32, an Oakland resident and former marine who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, has since undergone surgery on his spleen. He says it took hours for him to be taken to hospital, despite complaining of severe pain.


End the wars, regulate the banks, rid the US of corruption,
 government corruption included.
Audit the Privately owned Federal Reserve and eliminate it.
Get a real Central Bank owned by the people of the US,
not a private Central Bank filled with Corruption.
 The US government must work for the people and not the corporations.
The citizens of the US are fed up with corruption.
Get rid of the corrupt Lobby groups. All of them.
Some include
Corporate Lobby groups.
Israeli Lobby groups.
Private Prison Lobby Groups.
Drug Lobby Groups for pharma companies.
Oil Lobby Groups
The list goes on and on.

It is also time for the mainstream media to start telling the truth.
No more lies on behalf of the Government.
No more lies for the corporations.
No more lies. Journalist must do their job not tow the lies.
Now if that happened that would be a miracle. 

The world is fed up with US corruption. It is destroying the World.
All Free Trade Agreements must be revisited.
They have caused much poverty World Wide.

 A few other Corrupt entities on the planet.
  1. NATO
  2. UN
  3. World Bank
  4. IMF
  5. WTO

The list is longer, but these area few of the worst. They attempt to control the entire world, as well as the Governments of many  Countries. They are the real Dictators.

Around 1.5 million homeless as US enters 2011

December 30 2010

With the New Year just a day ahead, the United States has about 1.5 million people in need of shelter. How dire is the situation? We got some insight from Massachusetts social worker Jay S. Levy.
Jay S. Levy’s recently published book Homeless Narratives & Pretreatment Pathways: From Words to Housing (Loving Healing Press, 2010) is about homelessness and the issues related to outreach counseling, case management, and advocacy for long-term and episodically homeless individuals. Jay’s book presents real-life narratives of homeless people with whom the author worked to help them with housing, care, and treatment. The book discusses several key points involved in successful transition of people from homelessness to housing, and afterward. Jay has spent the last 20 years working with individuals who experience homelessness. He is currently employed by Massachusetts’ Eliot CHS-Homeless Services as the Western and Central MA Regional Manager for the statewide SAMHSA-PATH Program. In the following conversation, Jay talks about the fundamental facts and findings on homelessness, drawing on his personal experience of working for and with the homeless. Ernest: Hello Jay! It’s the first time for me to talk to an expert about homelessness. Now the general view of a homeless person is one who lives in the open and can’t financially afford living in a house. Is that correct? Jay: Firstly, thanks for the opportunity to discuss the important issue of homelessness. This is a very broad issue and the word homeless can encompass many things. It refers to individuals as well as to families. People are considered homeless if they are residing at a shelter, or outside, or in a vehicle, or any place that is normally not meant for human habitation. Some definitions of homelessness include the large numbers of people doubled up or couch surfing… adults or families who have no home of their own, but are dependent upon others for shelter. The HUD definition of homelessness does not include this large number of doubled up persons and is more restricted to counting people who are living outside or residing in homeless shelters. As you’ve mentioned, there is almost always a financial issue that intersects with any homeless situation, but the reasons and causes of homelessness are numerous. Ernest: So, as we speak here, how many people are homeless in America? Jay: There are various estimates and counts that are different due to either the definition of homelessness or the methodology used. Every year, HUD authorizes a point in time count that is done by the various continuums of care (regional networks) across the nation. The 2009 count reports over 643,000 persons, which is composed of approximately 63% individuals and 37% families and children. It is a one-night snapshot of homelessness, so the number is far less than reflected in the yearly count (HUD AHAR, 2010) that estimates over 1.5 million people seeking shelter. This includes the vast majority of short-term homeless folks that use the shelter on a temporary basis, while in between jobs and relationships, or for some other reason lack access to income or affordable housing. Also, it should be noted that the vast majority of adults that comprise homeless families are women, while homeless single adults are predominantly men. When you factor in the unsheltered population throughout an entire year or other definitions of homelessness, the estimates range from 2.3 to 3.5 million people who are homeless annually (Burt and Aron). A researcher by the name of Dennis Culhane has shared some important data that indicates that over a one year period, approximately 80% of individuals experiencing homelessness are in shelters on a short-term basis due to temporary setbacks resulting from job loss and lack of access to housing. In fact, our observations (among outreach workers) have confirmed that the vast majority of homeless persons very quickly cycle in and out of homelessness. That being said, jobs have really dried up and the economic tailspin has led to greater than nine percent unemployment. This has already negatively impacted family homelessness where the numbers have steadily risen over the past couple of years and there is concern that a similar trend may be now occurring with individuals. Ernest: What are some other reasons besides financial fragility that render people homeless in America? Jay: There are many things that are considered contributing factors that go beyond income and affordable housing issues. What we find among homeless individuals is a range of functioning levels, as well as chronic medical, substance abuse, and mental health issues are all part of the picture in conjunction with poverty and lack of affordable housing. Trauma and homelessness are clearly interlocked. What one experiences in order to become homeless can be emotionally devastating. The lasting effects may or may not warrant the DSM diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, but its impact remains profound and enduring. Sub-groups among the long-term homeless have experienced trauma at different levels. In fact, it is not unusual to meet homeless persons who have experienced layered trauma from an array of traumatic events. Veterans account for at least 13% of homeless individuals in America (HUD AHAR, 2010, p. 16) and many have experienced combat trauma. While less frequent, it is not unusual to meet homeless men and women, with foster care histories, who report profound physical and/or sexual trauma during their childhoods. Further, there are others who have sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI). An impact brain injury can cause major functional impairment, as well as significant psychological difficulty from the traumatic event that caused it. In addition, the high occurrence of substance abuse among homeless individuals (HUD AHAR, 2010, p. 22) and the associated lack of judgment and unstable relationships can result in the increased likelihood of witnessing or directly experiencing personal violence. This is especially true when you consider the unsafe living conditions that homeless persons often endure. The numbers of people who are homeless and have experienced trauma are significant, and so it is vital that a trauma-informed approach is adopted and consistently utilized. Finally, it should be noted that one of the main causes of homelessness is institutional discharges. Whether it be from foster care, the hospitals (mental health & medical), or the jails, people are discharged on a daily basis into homelessness without access to affordable housing and without adequate follow up plans. The long-term homeless are comprised of unaccompanied adults and couples who have been homeless for a year or more, as well as folks who have experienced multiple episodes of homelessness. Many of these people suffer from chronic medical issues, mental illness, and addictions, as well as from not having a home. We call this group the chronically homeless and this is where my expertise and interest converges. A significant percentage of this group consists of highly vulnerable people and unfortunately, every year many of them die from untreated illness and/or exposure to the elements. Our mission is to reach out to long-term homeless individuals and to build pathways to housing and needed treatment. My book tells the stories of different people experiencing long-term homelessness and gives an intricate view of the challenges inherent to building these pathways. In many instances, the outreach worker and client go on a figurative and literal journey in pursuit of housing, stability, and a better quality of life. That’s why my book is entitled “Homeless Narratives & Pretreatment Pathways: From Words to Housing”. I want to get beyond the numbers and tell people’s stories in an effort to provide a better connection between policy, programs, clinical approaches, and what people are really experiencing on the ground. Ernest: I assume the homeless are more vulnerable to accidents and diseases. What kinds of threats/misfortunes are these homeless people generally prone to, as tells your experience? Jay: The world of a person experiencing homelessness is fraught with challenges to one’s safety and it is not unusual to witness or experience violence. Many homeless individuals avoid the shelters due to fear for their own safety or concerns around their belongings being stolen. However, there is a catch 22 because if you stay outside in areas that either get exceedingly cold or hot, you are at risk for issues ranging from dehydration and heat stroke to frostbite and hypothermia. Many of the homeless we meet suffer from chronic untreated medical conditions. A national survey of homeless providers and their clients (Burt, et al. 1999, p. xix) found that 46% of these clients report chronic health conditions such as arthritis, cancer, diabetes, liver disease, HIV/AIDS, etc. These health issues, as well as chronic mental illness and addiction, are only exacerbated by unsafe, substandard living conditions that lack basic access to food, clean clothes, sanitary bathroom facilities, and a secure place to sleep. Additional research (Hwang et al., 1998; Hwang, 2000) shows that adults who are homeless and unsheltered for at least 6 months are at high risk of death if they fit one or more of the following criteria: age above 60, three or more visits to the emergency room during the prior 3 months, triple diagnosed (major mental illness, substance abuse, medical illness), history of frostbite and/or hypothermia or immersion foot, other medical conditionscirrhosis, heart failure, renal failure. When one considers the impact of unstable and chaotic environments on health issues, it’s hard to fathom why healthcare professionals and residential programs serving at-risk homeless individuals have often prioritized compliance with treatment above housing placement. It is clear that successful treatment is often dependent upon living conditions that promote, rather than diminish, health and safety. This is one of the main reasons why housing first initiatives and harm reduction approaches are vital to successfully addressing long term homelessness. Ernest: Okay Jay, tell us a little about the resources and services available to a person experiencing homelessness? Jay: I have found that many people with in the homeless community are very savvy as to where to find needed resources and services. The outreach worker is well served to use this naturally evolving community resource base, in addition to surfing the Internet or abiding by local service directories. That being said… one of the more important tasks of outreach work is to help people to become acquainted and eligible for the array of basic services and resources that are available, as well as serve as a guide through the bureaucratic maze that one inevitably encounters. It is critical that homeless persons are able to access what they need in order to survive and move beyond homelessness. Most major urban centers such as Washington DC, New York City, and Boston provide access to meal programs, shelters, Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA), Social Security offices, and housing authorities, as well as other homeless providers. However, smaller urban centers and rural areas often lack needed resources, making it difficult to find basic things… like food and shelter! In addition, public transportation is often not available to help people reach more resource and service rich areas. On the other end of the spectrum, one of the more exciting developments has been the promulgation of Housing First alternatives. A housing first approach recognizes that the critical intervention is to house people as rapidly as possible, while simultaneously offering support services, but not require treatment as a prerequisite to getting housed. This approach has shown some initial success by demonstrating housing retention and reducing the financial costs associated with homelessness (Stefancic and Tsemberis, 2007). Out in Western MA, where I work, and many other places, such as Denver, NYC, and Boston, we have begun providing affordable housing alternatives with support services that long-term homeless persons can easily access as long as they’re agreeable to taking on the challenges of paying rent, getting along with neighbors, and taking care of their apartment. There is some compelling evidence that housing First Programs have not only reduced financial costs and the numbers of unsheltered long-term homeless individuals, but it has also saved people’s lives. Many of the people who are among the long-term homeless are untreated while suffering from major mental illnesses, addictions, and chronic medical issues. They often lack the necessary insight and judgment to accept needed treatment services unless they are first housed and then provided with the opportunity to gradually build trusting relationships with service providers. Housing First can and does eventually lead to treatment, while keeping people safe from the elements. It is the ultimate harm reduction program! Ernest: And what are some of the major roles that government and non government entities can serve in helping the homeless in America? Jay: Considering the reported difficulties of accessing resources and services and the dizzying effects of needless bureaucracy, it is important to utilize what we have in the most efficient manner possible. Currently, Ten and Five Year Plans have been developed and implemented in an effort to end chronic homelessness, and thereby reduce social and financial costs (All Roads Lead Home, 2008; The Commonwealth of MA, 2003; National Alliance to End Homelessness, 2000). Ultimately, these plans are based on collaborative efforts between concerned individuals, advocacy groups, local city and town employees, politicians, policy makers, non-profit service providers, charities, businesses, etc. These collaborative networks are being established to address fundamental issues such as developing affordable housing with support services, promoting better access to community-based resources and services, and implementing strategies of prevention in order to reduce future homelessness. Advocates and policy makers now understand that addressing access, resource and prevention issues are paramount, if we are to be successful in turning long-term homelessness into a rare or unusual phenomenon. This has culminated in the Obama Administration’s recent unveiling of the first National Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness (US Interagency Council on Homelessness, 2010). This plan declares support for housing first initiatives and continued interagency collaboration in an effort to make significant inroads with both families and individuals. While this is good news from the standpoint of new cooperative networks and more efficient use of resources, this does not directly address macroeconomic issues that impact unemployment, underemployment, and the lack of affordable housing. Ernest: Tell me Jay, what can the layman do to help the homeless? Jay: There are a number of things that can be done. Many positive things can happen when there is a sense of caring and human contact. Get to know the names of some of the homeless persons that you frequently meet in your daily travels or in your neighborhood. Don’t be afraid to ask if they are getting any help or if there are any basic things that they need. If you are wary of donating money directly to a person experiencing homelessness, consider giving them need items such as food, clothes, or even information regarding a nearby resource center. Many organizations working for the homeless accept financial donations. If you know of any homeless services and resources, it’s a pretty sure bet that these organizations are financially strained. Consider donating, but doing so toward funding a specific cause such as providing rental assistance and supporting transitions to housing. Many other places like the Salvation Army or community resource centers accept donations of food, household items, and clothes. Another nice way to contribute is by way of volunteer service. Currently, my daughter volunteers her time at a Survival Center that provides clothing, serves hot meals, and has a food pantry that serves our local community, which includes the homeless. Meal programs are often in need of volunteers to help prepare and serve meals to people who are struggling to make ends meet. Ernest: For all interested readers, would you tell us who and/or where to reach for help in case some homeless person/family is noticed in search of help? Jay: The key is to find out what are the homeless resources and services in your area. Every state has PATH programs that are funded by both state and federal dollars. PATH stands for Projects for Assistance in Transitions from Homelessness. The people in charge of these programs are very informed regarding homeless resources and services. Most states have funded various non-profits, so you want to locate the right service provider for your region. This can be done by going to the following website: http://pathprogram.samhsa.gov/Channel/Default.aspx. Once you get to the PATH-SAMHSA website, just click on the “Grantees” tab and then you can do a search for the homeless service organization that serves your particular state and region. I work for Eliot CHS-Homeless Services and we are the sole PATH Provider serving Massachusetts. I am the regional manager for both Central and Western Massachusetts and have counterparts that manage the North East and South East regions of our state. Our program is listed on the PATH website and if someone were to call, we could direct them to critical resources and services. Other places to look for help include the local Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA), where people can access Food Stamps, Emergency Assistance funds, and health insurance. Local DTA caseworkers normally have access to information on family and individual shelters and meal programs across the region that they cover. If that fails, an Internet search under homeless shelters and/or meal programs for your particular area will most likely yield results. Finally, check your local phone directory under Social & Human Services, or inquire with your local church or synagogue. Places of faith are often quite involved with supporting community meal programs and other charitable efforts toward helping those who are most in need. Directing a homeless family or person to local resources and services can be the first critical step toward attaining critical assistance ranging from shelters and meals to healthcare and housing. Ernest: Many thanks Jay for sharing your precious knowledge and taking time for this talk! Jay: I appreciate you taking the time to interviewing me, and providing a forum for talking about these important issues. If anyone would like more information on my book including some recent reviews, please check out my website. Thanks! Source

In 2011 2.3 million people are in prison

In 2009:  People

  • On Probation 4,203,967
  • On Parole 819,308
  • In Jail  760,400
  • In Prison 1,524,513

Grand Total  7,225,80

The total numbers are higher now.  Profiteers are making a fortune on prisoners.

The Prison Industry in the United States Costs Taxpayers Billions

Related

World Wide Occupy Wall Street Protests

‘US plans to suppress OWS protesters’
November 18 2011
The US government is making ‘coordinated efforts’ aimed at suppressing the ‘Occupy’ movement that has spread across the country, an American journalist says.

“The fact that all the mayors seem to be reading from a script when they explain why they are cracking down, it’s almost ludicrous how they use the same excuses, the same wording, and the same techniques,” author and investigative journalist, David Lindorff said during an interview with Press TV’s US Desk.

According to Lindorff, Oakland’s mayor Jean Quan, has admitted to having a conference call with 18 other mayors, while in Washington.

Lindorff added that he is almost certain the call was organized by the US government, most likely “by someone like Janet Napolitano from the Homeland Security.”

The investigative journalist further criticized the unnecessary violent response peaceful protesters were receiving from riot police, questioning their claims of concerns “about sanitation and safety.”

The Occupy movement owes its name to ‘Occupy Wall Street’ (OWS), which emerged on September 17, when a group of demonstrators gathered in New York’s financial district to protest social inequality and top-level corruption in the country.

Despite police hindrance and mass arrests, the Occupy movement has now spread to major US cities.

The movement has also inspired similar pushes across the world, including in Australia, Britain, Germany, Italy, Spain, Ireland, and Portugal.  Source

This is a must watch Video.

Speakers are Dan Glazebrook, Lizzie Phelan, Harpal Brar

OCCUPY-movement

Tons of information HERE Ne sure to check it out.

Stay Right Here

The link below has numerous updates and information on the Occupy movement in Canada

Updates in Canada

 Recent

Israel: Segregation of Children in Extremist religious schools, Lost rights of Women

US wants to Censor the Internet

Over 7,000 prisoners are held in Libya

New leaders in Greece, Italy are BANKERS

US is lobbying nations to bring Cluster Bombs back “NO” would be my Answer

Canada: Stop Harper’s cruel crime bill

ICC to Probe NATO, NTC War Crimes in Libya War


		

One Comment

  1. greetings by
    http://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2011/10/16/occupy-movement/


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