McDonald’s drops U.S. egg supplier over ‘disturbing’ animal-cruelty video

By Mira Oberman

Nov 19, 2011

CHICAGO — Fast food giant McDonald’s severed ties with one of its American egg suppliers Friday after a video taken by undercover animal rights activists exposed shocking cruelty to chickens at a farm.

The footage showed chicks having the tips of their beaks being burned off by a machine and then tossed into cages along with images of barely identifiable corpses of birds that were left to rot in cages.

It also showed unwanted chicks left to die in plastic bags, birds mangled by the bars of overcrowded cages, and a chicken flapping its wings in distress as a plant worker swung the creature on a rope in a wide circle.

There are no federal laws governing the treatment of poultry on U.S. farms and most states have sweeping exemptions for farmed animals which allow for abuses to run rampant without prosecution.

“Unfortunately, much of the abuse we documented is not only standard, it’s legal,” Nathan Runkle, director of Mercy for Animals, which obtained the clandestine footage, told AFP.

“We’ve done over a dozen investigations at factory farms from coast to coast,” he said. “Every time we’ve sent an investigator into one of these facilities they’ve come out with shocking evidence of abuse and neglect.”

McDonald’s confirmed it had directed its supplier, Cargill, to stop sourcing McDonald eggs from Sparboe, the company at the center of the cruelty video.

“The behavior on tape is disturbing and completely unacceptable,” McDonald’s said in a statement.

“McDonald’s wants to assure our customers that we demand humane treatment of animals by our suppliers. We take this responsibility — along with our customers’ trust — very seriously.”

Sparboe, a family-run company, said it had launched a probe after learning of the video and has fired four workers who engaged in mistreatment of chickens.

In a message posted on a dedicated website, owner Beth Sparboe Schnell said an independent auditor from Iowa State University confirmed the company is in “full compliance with our animal welfare policies.”

She said Sparboe Farms was the first American egg producer to have its “science-based animal care production guideline” certified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

But Runkle noted that the video shows that “much of the mishandling type of abuse took place directly in front of and under the watch of supervisors and managers” at Sparboe facilities in Iowa, Minnesota and Colorado.

He also said McDonald’s decision to drop Sparboe as a supplier also fails to provide a solution to the real problem — the use of cramped battery cages which give hens no room to walk or spread their wings, Runkle added.

Mercy for Animals said it was urging McDonald’s to use its influence as the largest egg purchaser in the United States to improve industry standards and stop buying eggs from farms that use such cages.

The video was released a day after federal inspectors issued a warning letter to Sparboe citing “serious violations” of food safety rules, including inadequate rodent control and testing for the presence of deadly Salmonella bacteria. Source

McDonald’s Cruelty: The Rotten Truth About Egg McMuffins‬

November 17 2011

Factory Farming is what they are talking about.

Factory Farming is horrid and the cruelty towards animals is beyond anything imaginable. Your really should see what happens to the animals you are eating and the unhealthy environment they are raised in.

I have a few examples of it below.

Food Inc. An unflattering look inside America’s corporate controlled food industry.

This documentary covers Chickens and Cattle For eating.

Go HERE for Documentary Wait for the Free User to come up and click on it.

Go HERE for more links if the Above one does not work.

Now here we have a few other Shorter Videos on Factory Farming

Hens Abused at Major California Egg Factory Farm

Rosebud Hog Factory – Part 1

At this crowded South Dakota factory farm, pigs limp across their pens exhibiting basketball-sized ruptures (hernias) and huge infected abscesses.

Rosebud Hog Factory – Part 2

Nebraska Hog Factory – Part 1

Emaciated female breeding sows, many with open sores, are housed at this factory farm in crates measuring 19 inches wide — even smaller than the industry norm of 24 inches

Nebraska Hog Factory – Part 2

Downed Animals

Disabled cows at this Nebraska slaughterhouse are dragged off trucks with a chain, then are abandoned for days without food, water, or protection from the elements. Many die from their injuries, illnesses, starvation, or dehydration.

Humane Farming Association on Oprah

September 21, 2011

HFA’s Bradley Miller talking about the veal industry on Oprah.

 

Cow Factory Farming.

Investigation Reveals Cruelty at Pig Factory Farm

This video I posted so you can see what is done to the baby pigs.  Even if your not a vegetarian you must still see this as very cruel inhumane treatment of an animal.

The Pig Picture Part 1

The Pig Picture highlights never-before-seen-HFA investigative footage. This powerful 18-minute video traces the development of commercial pig rearing in America – from the small-scale family farms of yesterday – to the corporate owned pig factories of today.

 

The Pig Picture Part 2

More information and Videos HERE

Humane Farming Association

Mercy for Animals

Animals need room to roam.

They need fresh air and to be clean.

Any animals who are caged or over crowed, as the animals in the videos go insane.

Imagine if you were trapped in a small room 10 feet by 10 feet with 20 people how would you feel. You have to stay in that small room until the day you die.

Think about it.

There are still many farmers who do not use factory farming methods to raise their animals.

The food they produce is much safer and the animals have less illnesses.

Antibiotics nor hormones should be put into food fed to animals.

The only time antibiotics should be used is if he animals is ill.

The US needs to protect your food supply, not let things like Factory Farming take over your food supply.  Factory Farming should be outlawed and normal farmers grow your food. Farm Animals need to be protected.

Imagine if those things were done your a dog or cat. Well Farm Animals need love and protection just like your pets.

Farm animals  have feelings too.

I know I grew up around farmers. They never would  do anything this horrible to any animal.  They treated their animals extremely well.

Factory Farms are not Real Farmers they are just greedy profiteers.

Real Farmers take great care with their animals.

I buy all my meat from Real Farmers.

I know first hand how they are treated.

I know first hand what they are fed.

I know the Farmers personally.

Factory Farms put Real Farmers out of business.

The thought of eating anything that comes from a Factory farm turns my stomach.

I kid you not Been there, Done that, Got the tee shirts.

Just watching the Videos of those poor animals made me chuck my cookies.

I don’t eat Fast Food. I would never know where the meat comes from.

I don’t take chances with my health. I also do not want to contribute to animal cruelty.

If you hate puppy mills then you should hate Factory Farms.

If you however wish to continue to eat Factory Farm Food

Remember you are contributing to the cruelty of innocent animals.

A happy animal is a healthier animal.

Animals need to go outside and have freedom to live just like we do. They need to feel the grass under their feet, the sunshine and enjoy the shade of trees. They should be respected and treated humanly.

As a consumer you can demand food from Real Farmers who raise animals in a safe, clean, healthy and humane environment.

We are after all the 99%.

Don’t allow A Factory Farm in your community.

This doesn’t just happen in the US. Factory Farming has spread to other Countries.

Now for something else you should know about

Supreme Court case: meat industry sues to keep downed animals in food supply

By Michael Greger, M.D.
Nov 3 2011

This week I participated in a press briefing to discuss National Meat Association v. Harris, a case appearing before the Supreme Court next week. The meat industry is trying to overturn a California law meant to keep “downed” animals—those too sick and disabled to walk to slaughter—out of the American food supply.

In 2008, an undercover investigation of a dairy cow slaughterplant in California showed that downers were being dragged to slaughter for hamburger meat distributed to the Federal School Lunch Program. The Humane Society of the United States investigators documented workers dragging downed cows with chains, ramming them with forklifts, shocking cows repeatedly in the face and eyes, beating them, and even shooting high-pressure hoses up their nostrils—anything to squeeze every last bit of profit from these animals. The investigation triggered the largest meat recall in U.S. history—143 million pounds of beef—for violations of food safety regulations meant to protect the public from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (“mad cow disease”).

The investigation prompted California to strengthen its laws to keep downer livestock out of the food supply.  The meat industry—represented by the National Meat Association and the American Meat Institute—responded by suing the State of California to block the enforcement of the law on the grounds that only USDA had the authority to determine which animals are turned into meat. The California Attorney General argued that states should have the right to protect their citizens from the risks and abuses inherent in slaughtering downed animals. In response to the meat industry lawsuit, a federal judge temporarily blocked the enforcement of the downer ban, but the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the decision and reinstated the law. So the National Meat Association took it to the Supreme Court.

The handling of downers is not just an animal welfare issue. Inability to stand can be a symptom of disease that could threaten public health. Compared to those able to walk, downed cows were found to have 3 times the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7, the strain that kills dozens of Americans a year. The researchers concluded “downer dairy cattle harboring E. coli O157:H7 at slaughter may be an important source of contamination and may contribute to the health risk associated with ground beef.” A single downed cow infected with such a pathogen could theoretically contaminate more than 100,000 hamburgers with an infectious dose.

Downer pigs and sheep may also present a food safety risk. Downed pigs have been found to have 16 times the odds of antibiotic resistant Campylobacter infection, the most common cause of bacterial food poisoning in the United States. Allowing downer pigs in the food supply, concluded one team of researchers, “potentially endangers public health.”

Even if one doesn’t eat meat, more than half of downer pigs tested in the Midwest were found to be actively infected with swine flu, both the classic swine flu virus and the triple hybrid mutant that led to the 2009 human pandemic that killed more than ten thousand Americans.

Other human pathogens linked to downed farm animals include anthrax, Salmonella, and mad cow disease.  At least two-thirds of the 22 mad cows so far discovered in North America have been downer cows. Though the riskiest tissues—the brains, eyes, and spinal cords—of most cattle are now excluded from most food items in the United States, there may be contamination of muscle meat via aerosolization of the spinal cord during carcass splitting. Significant amounts of central nervous system debris found accumulating in the splitting saws used to halve the carcasses may have the potential to then transfer contagion from one carcass to the next. Although, technically, processors are instructed to knife-trim “material grossly identifiable as brain material, spinal cord, or fluid from punctured eyes,” researchers have reported finding nervous tissue contaminating muscle in a commercial slaughter plant. Contamination of meat derived from cattle cheeks with brain tissue can also occur if the cheek meat is not removed before the skull is fragmented or split. Finally, captive bolt stunning, the predominant method used to render farm animals insensible before being bled to death, may blow a shower of embolic brain tissue into the animals’ bloodstream. Texas A&M University researchers found bodily brain fragments as large as 14 cm. The researchers concluded that mad cow pathogens could potentially be “found throughout the bodies of animals stunned for slaughter.”

An unequivocal ban on the slaughter of downed animals for human consumption would remove the incentive for the meat industry to transport and torment these animals rather than euthanize them, and thereby bolster the safety of the food supply. Sick animals can lead to sick people. Source

USDA Wants Poultry Producers to Regulate Themselves

Mar 16, 2012

A report has been released by the Food & Water Watch which stated that the USDA wants poultry producers to regulate themselves. Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) called this idea a “Recipe for food safety disaster”. Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian discuss this report and some of it’s more disgusting findings.

Related

Food Fraud-Yummy! Ammonia-Treated Pink Slime Now in Most U.S. Ground Beef

Added September 20 2012

“Pink Slime”: Back, With a $1.2 Billion Lawsuit

 

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