Canada: Father Dan Miller has pleaded guilty to five counts of indecent assault

Father Daniel Miller pleaded guilty 

 

Father Dan Miller has pleaded guilty to five counts of indecent assault in Pembroke Court this week. He was originally charged with 12 counts involving young boys while he was a priest at several locations in the Ottawa Valley. A pre-sentence report has been ordered and the sentencing phase is set to begin September 17th. Miller remains out of custody pending the sentencing hearings. Source

For more complete information on Father Dan Miller Go to the link HERE

 

Canadian clergy and other prominent Roman Catholics publicly accused, sued and or charged in relation to allegations of criminal acts of any nature and/or actions which are unbecoming to that person’s station in life.  Please send names and details (newspaper clippings, legal documents) of those who should be added to the list.  Also please advise on the outcome of trials or legal action. For information on those charged or to report abases pending or have already gone to trial Go HERE

Another offender recently convicted.

Paul Laframboise given 18 more months

Jun 6, 2013 By Patricia Leboeuf


EMC news -After getting an additional 18 months for molesting four teenage girls, Paul Laframboise started shaking, wringing his hands and muttered “I’m going to die.”

The 74-year-old Fitzroy Harbour man had previously pleaded guilty to several charges including sexual assault, sexual exploitation and sexual interference as well as careless storage of guns.

He has been in jail since October and has served 225 days behind bars.

Laframboise remained stone-faced as Judge Heather Perkins-McVey read impact statements the girls provided, highlighting how profoundly affected they all were by his actions.

Two of the girls wrote about their attempted suicide while another described how she would wake up in tears, terrified that he would find her and hurt her.

She no longer trusts people, particularly older men.

She now lives in constant fear that she will be harmed for stepping forward.

Another blamed herself and fears she is seen differently be her peers. Her self esteem and self worth have been deeply affected. All four bare deep emotional pain from his actions, according to the judge. They also wrote that the media had also caused further harm by publishing lurid and identifying details.

Laframboise previously spoke of his deep remorse, but Perkins-McVey did not feel he truly comprehended the deep turmoil he inflicted on the girls.

“You speak about your life and health,” she said. “You show little realization on how it affects your victims.”

Laframboise’s lawyer Joseph Addelman argued for a more lenient sentence consisting of an additional 34 days, citing that his client was old, sick and this was his first offense. He had also pleaded guilty, allowing his victims to avoid having to testify in court. And he brought forth his own difficult upbringing, his aboriginal status and the unwavering support of his wife of 52 years.

JUDGE SENDS MESSAGE

Perkins-McVey took these aspects into consideration, but ultimately decided she needed to send a message that children are to be cherished and protected.

Laframboise had been an upstanding member of the Fitzroy Harbour community for several years, working as a Sunday school teacher and a school custodian, she said.

After being asked to step down from his church role for unknown reasons, he spiraled downwards, drinking heavily and allegedly occurring $200,000 in gambling debts.

Perkins-McVey said that despite his remorse, he consistently portrayed himself as a victim of the justice system.

Previously in court, he told the judge to “do to me what you politically must” as he no longer trusted Man, was used to being treated like garbage and life was knocking him down.

Once released, he will receive three years of probation and his DNA will be put on record.

As the judge discussed what to do with his weapons, some of which are heirlooms, Laframboise rose to his feet, leaning up against the glass partition of the prisoner’s box. He called over his lawyer, muttering that the judge couldn’t take much more from him.

He was given the option between incarceration in Toronto with treatment on location or staying in Ottawa and receiving treatment afterwards. He chose to remain close to home.

He was given an evaluation by a psychiatrist who access that he was at a low risk to reoffend despite being aroused by adolescents.  Source

Man, 74, gets 18 months added on for molesting teens

Saturday, June 1, 2013

By Chloé Fedio, Ottawa Citizen

OTTAWA — A 74-year-old former Sunday school teacher wrung his hands and muttered, “I’m going to die,” after he was sentenced to an additional 18 months in jail for molesting four teenage girls.

Paul Laframboise offered the girls money, cigarettes and booze to keep them muted — and told one he would kill himself if she told anyone what he had done.

“He told her where he would put his suicide note,” Justice Heather Perkins-McVey said during her decision.

But the girls did come forward to report what the Fitzroy Harbour man had done between May 2010 and October 2012, and their victim impact statements revealed how “profoundly affected” they were by his actions, Perkins-McVey said.

Two girls described their suicide attempts.

One girl wrote that even though he is locked up, she still lives in fear of him and continues to suffer sleepless nights.

“He will find me and hurt me because I told someone,” she wrote. “I can’t trust people anymore.”

Another girl described how she feels “gross, disgusting and dirty” when she has flashbacks of being molested.

“The effects have been devastating,” Perkins-McVey told Laframboise. “It’s very sad that those young girls feel responsible.”

Laframboise has been in jail since his arrest in October 2012 — and served 225 days in custody before his sentencing. He did not seek bail and pleaded guilty to half a dozen charges, including sexual assault, sexual exploitation and sexual interference.

Laframboise also pleaded guilty to the careless storage of three rifles and a Luger-style handgun.

Despite an expression of remorse and pleas of guilty, which spared the girls from having to testify, Perkins-McVey said Laframboise had “little insight” into the devastating effect of his actions.

“If you truly appreciated that, you wouldn’t see yourself as a victim,” she told him.

Laframboise previously told the court, “Do to me what you politically must.”

He also said, “I have grown quite used to being treated like garbage.”

Perkins-McVey rejected the suggestion that he was “a victim of the justice system.”

Perkins-McVey did consider his aboriginal status, advanced age, health problems and the fact that this is his first conviction. She also considered that he was a positive member of his community for many years, working as a Sunday school teacher, volunteer firefighter and school custodian.

But Perkins-McVey said she needed to send a message that “children are to be cherished and respected.” Source

Recognizing the signs

Following a sexual assault, victims have a wide range of reactions, which are influenced by many factors: their age, personality, the form of sexual assault committed against them, their relationship with their assailant, the degree of violence they experienced and the frequency of the assaults.

However, in the days immediately following an assault, here are some of the common reactions of an adult or underage victim in a state of shock:

  • Acting angry and/or aggressive with people around them
  • Intense fear
  • Feelings of sadness and depression
  • Frequent mood swings
  • Problems sleeping
  • Problems eating
  • Less tolerance for situations that are perceived as a threat to one’s safety
  • Lack of organization, anxiety
  • Isolation

http://www.agressionssexuelles.gouv.qc.ca/en/what-can-we-do/signs.php

Effects of Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is a personal and destructive crime. Its effects on you and your loved ones can be psychological, emotional, and/or physical. They can be brief in duration or last a very long time. It is important to remember that there is not one “normal” reaction to sexual assault. Therefore your individual response will be different depending on your personal circumstances. In this section, we explain some of the more common effects that sexual assault victims may experience.

Depression: There are many emotional and psychological reactions that victims of rape and sexual assault can experience. One of the most common of these is depression. The term “depression” can be confusing since many of the symptoms are experienced by people as normal reactions to events. At some point or another, everyone feels sad or “blue.” This also means that recognizing depression can be difficult since the symptoms can easily be attributed to other causes. These feelings are perfectly normal, especially during difficult times.

Depression becomes something more than just normal feelings of sadness when the symptoms last for more than two weeks. Therefore, if you experience five or more of the symptoms of depression over the course of two weeks you should consider talking to your doctor about what you are experiencing. The symptoms of depression may include:

  • Prolonged sadness or unexplained crying spells
  • Significant change in weight or appetite
  • Loss of energy or persistent fatigue
  • Significant change in sleep patterns (insomnia, sleeping too much, fitful sleep, etc.)
  • Loss of interest and pleasure in activities previously enjoyed; social withdrawal
  • Feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness or guilt
  • Pessimism or indifference
  • Unexplained aches and pains (headaches, stomachaches)
  • Inability to concentrate, indecisiveness
  • Irritability, worry, anger, agitation, or anxiety
  • Thoughts of death or suicide
    • If you are having suicidal thoughts, don’t wait to get help. Call us or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) at any time.

Depression can affect people of any age, gender, race, ethnicity, or religion. Depression is not a sign of weakness, and it is not something that someone can make him/herself “snap out of.”

Rate your risk for depression

Flashbacks: when memories of past traumas feel as if they are taking place in the current moment. These memories can take many forms: dreams, sounds, smells, images, body sensations, or overwhelming emotions. This re-experience of the trauma often seems to come from nowhere, and therefore blurs the lines between past and present, leaving the individual feeling anxious, scared, and/or powerless. It can also trigger any other emotions that were felt at the time of the trauma.

Some flashbacks are mild and brief, a passing moment, while others may be powerful and last a long time. Many times you may not even realize that you are having a flashback and may feel faint and/or dissociate (a mental process in which your thoughts and feelings may be separated from your immediate reality). If you realize you are in the middle of a flashback:

  • First, Get Grounded: The first thing to do is sit up straight and put both feet on the floor. This will help you to feel grounded.
  • Be In the Present: It can be helpful to remind yourself that the event you are reliving happened in the past and you are now in the present. The actual event is over, and you survived.
  • Breathing: Try focusing on your breathing. One way to do that is to count to four as you breathe in. Count to four as you hold that breath and then count to four as you exhale. If you do this and keep repeating it, you may find that you can become calmer and can be in the present.
  • Pay Attention to Surroundings: Another way to help yourself feel like you are in the present is to pay attention to your surroundings. What is the light in the room like right now? Touch something around you that is grounded like a table or a chair. What does it feel like? Can you smell anything? Do you hear any sounds?
  • Self-Soothing: Are there things that normally make you feel safe and secure like wrapping a blanket around yourself or making some tea?
  • Normal: Also, remember that it can take time to recover. You are not crazy. This is a normal reaction.
  • Take care of yourself: Give yourself time to recover after a flashback. Reach out to loved ones or counselors who will be supportive.

Rape Trauma: a common reaction to rape or sexual assault. It is a normal human reaction to an unnatural or extreme event. There are three phases to rape trauma:

  • Acute Phase: occurs immediately after the assault and usually lasts a few days to several weeks. In this phase, you can have many reactions but they typically fall into three different categories:
    • Expressed: when you are openly emotional
    • Controlled: when you appear to be without emotion, and act as if “nothing happened” and “everything is fine”
    • Shocked disbelief: when you react with a strong sense of disorientation
  • Outward Adjustment Phase: resume what appears to be your “normal” life, but inside you are still suffering from considerable turmoil. This phase has five primary coping techniques:
    • Minimization: pretending that everything is fine or convincing yourself that “it could have been worse”
    • Dramatization: you cannot stop talking about the assault and it dominates your life and identity
    • Suppression: you refuse to discuss the event and act as if it did not happen
    • Explanation: you analyze what happened, what you did and what the rapist was thinking/feeling
    • Flight: you try to escape the pain (moving, changing jobs, changing appearance, changing relationships, etc.)
  • Resolution Phase: the assault is no longer the central focus of your life. While you may recognize that you will never forget the assault, the pain and negative outcomes lessen over time. Often you will begin to accept the rape as part of your life and choose to move on.

NOTE: This model assumes that you will take steps forward and backwards in your healing process and that while there are phases it is not a linear progression and will be different for every person.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: a normal human reaction to an extreme or abnormal situation. Each person has a different threshold for what is perceived as a traumatic event. PTSD is not a rare or unusual occurrence, in fact, many people experience PTSD as a result of a traumatic experience such as rape or sexual assault. You may be experiencing PTSD if you have experienced the following symptoms for at least a month:

  • Shown symptoms of intense horror, helplessness, or fear
  • Experienced distressing memories of the event
  • Regularly avoided things or triggers that remind you of the event
  • Shown significant impairment or distress due to the event
  • Shown at least two symptoms of increased arousal (sleep difficulties, difficulty concentrating, hyper vigilance, an exaggerated startle response, or irritability or outbursts of anger/rage)

Pregnancy: Because rape, just like consensual sex, can lead to pregnancy, it is important for female victims to be tested after an assault. If you need additional information visit Medline Plus

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs):

Victims of sexual violence are at risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections.

  • If you went to the emergency room for a rape exam, you should have been offered preventive treatment (antibiotics) for sexually transmitted infections and given information about where to go for follow-up testing.
    • If you need more information about this, or did not receive preventive care, call us and we can help you figure out what resources are available.
  • If you did not get medical care after your attack, it’s still important to get tested for sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.
    • The Centers for Disease Control recommend follow-up testing two weeks after a sexual assault and blood tests to rule out HIV infection 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after an assault.
  • If left untreated, STIs and HIV can cause major medical problems, so it’s very important to get tested (and treated, if necessary) as soon as possible.

Suicide

Some survivors of sexual assault may get so depressed that they think about ending their own life. Suicidal thoughts should be taken very seriously.

  • If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, please get help immediately.
    • If you have already taken steps, or feel that you can’t avoid harming yourself, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.
    • You can also call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline for help 24 hours a day at 800-273-TALK (8255). If you are having suicidal thoughts or you know someone who is, they can listen and help.
    • If you are worried that a loved one is contemplating suicide, it’s okay to ask them about it directly. Suicide experts say that asking someone about suicidal thoughts will not lead them to consider suicide if they’re not already contemplating it.

Effects for Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Assault:
There are many reactions that survivors of rape and sexual assault can have. But for adult survivors of childhood sexual assault there are reactions that may either be different or stronger than for other survivors. These include:

  • Setting limits/boundaries: because your personal boundaries were invaded at a young age by someone that was trusted and depended on, you may have trouble understanding that you have the right to control what happens to you.
  • Memories/flashbacks.
  • Anger: as a child, your anger was powerless and had little to no effect on the actions of your abuser. For this reason, you may not feel confident that your anger will be useful or helpful.
  • Grieving/mourning: being abused as a child means the loss of many things: childhood experiences, trust, perceived innocence, and a normal relationship with family members (especially if the abuser was a family member). You must be allowed to name those losses, grieve them, and then move forward.
  • Guilt/shame/blame: you may carry a lot of guilt because you may have experienced pleasure or because you did not try to stop the abuse. There may have been silence surrounding the abuse that led to feelings of shame. It is important to understand that it was the adult who abused his/her position of authority and should be held accountable, not you
  • Trust: learning to trust again may be very difficult for you.
  • Coping skills: as a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, you may have developed skills in order to cope with the trauma. Some of these are healthy (possibly separating yourself from certain family members, seeking out counseling, etc.); some are not (drinking or drug abuse, promiscuous sexual activity, etc.).
  • Self-esteem/isolation: low self-esteem is a result of all the negative messages you received and internalized from your abusers. And because entering into an intimate relationship involves trust, respect, love, and the ability to share, you may flee from intimacy or hold on too tightly for fear of losing the relationship.
  • Sexuality: many survivors have to deal with the fact that their first sexual experience came as a result of sexual abuse. You may experience the return of body memories while engaging in a sexual activity with another person.

Body Memories: when the memories of the abuse you experienced take the form of physical problems that cannot be explained by the usual means (medical examinations, etc.). These maladies are often called “psychosomatic symptoms” which does not, as many people think, mean that it is “in your head.” Rather, it means that the symptoms are due to the connection between the mind and the body. Physical problems that can come of these somatic memories include:

  • Headaches, migraines
  • Light headedness/dizziness
  • Stomach difficulties
  • Hot/cold flashes
  • Grinding of teeth
  • Sleep disorders

 

http://www.victimservicecenter.com/get-info/effects-of-sexual-assault

For more information Use a search engine and look for signs of Sexual assault.

Numerous sites will come up. Learn as much as you can on the subject.

Knowledge is the key to prevention and healing.

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Rabbi’s are just as abusive as those from any other Religions

 

4 Comments

  1. Articles like this one are important for exposing the criminal activities of men that plague women. In addition, the recovery comments are helpful if the person assaulted is able to be in control of her recovery. For myself, I can’t imagine life ever being normal again after being degraded in such a horrendous way.

  2. One never really recovers they just manage to live on. Some do better then others. The earlier the intervention the better the recovery it seems. One never forgets.

  3. I think you are right; who could ever forget the violence of sexual assault. Unfortunately children are not sacred either so it’s no wonder so many are dysfunctional.

  4. All we can do is educate people and work to protect all those involved as best we can, including children.
    Prevention is the cure. Helping those it has happened to is the road to healing. Anyone can reach out and give a helping hand.
    We all have the ability to listen and sometimes that is what a victim needs more then anything.


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