‘Secret serum’: Experimental Ebola drug used to treat 2 US aid workers

Two US aid workers have been getting an experimental anti-Ebola drug and their condition has dramatically improved. However, it’s not clear yet if the recovery is due to the treatment that’s never been tested on humans and appeared only earlier this year.

Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly are currently at Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital. They asked for the treatment while still being treated in Liberia: despite the drug not being approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, the current restriction is only valid on the US territory, Reuters reported.

The pair contracted the disease while working in Liberia. An FDA spokeswoman said she could neither confirm nor deny that the drug had been used on the two aid workers after their arrival in the US.

Writebol, 59, has been in isolation in Liberia since her diagnosis was confirmed last month. After taking the drug, she is able to walk with assistance and has regained her appetite, according to Bruce Johnson, president of the aid group Writebol is working for, SIM USA.

Johnson, however, was in no hurry to attribute her recovery to the pharmaceutical treatment.

‘Terrifying’: Ebola panic after passenger on Sierra Leone flight to London dies

“Ebola is a tricky virus and one day you can be up and the next day down. One day is not indicative of the outcome. But we’re grateful this medicine was available,” he stated.

Brantly, 33, who is an employee of the international group Samaritan’s Purse, is also recovering. Apart from the drug, he got a blood transfusion from a 14-year-old Ebola survivor, who had been under Brantly’s care before.

A source close to the Atlanta hospital, where Brantly is being treated, told CNN, “Within an hour of receiving the medication, Brantly’s condition was nearly reversed. His breathing improved; the rash over his trunk faded away.”

It was the group Samaritan’s Purse who asked for the experimental drug, the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases stated on Monday. The organization reached the officials of the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Liberia, and was sent to a NIH specialist in Liberia who knew about the drug.

The scientist sent them to the companies producing the treatment, but had no “official role in procuring, transporting, approving, or administering the experimental products,” the statement added.

‘Moral bankruptcy of capitalism’: UK’s top public doctor shames western society over Ebola

The drug used to treat the two is called ZMapp and boosts the immune system to battle against Ebola. The treatment consists of antibodies from lab animals exposed to the virus.

Initially, the drug was reported as the possible treatment in January, according to the production company, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. of San Diego, which has been developing the drug.

They are working with LeafBio of San Diego, Defyrus Inc. of Toronto, the US government, and the Public Health Agency of Canada, the statement also read.

Among other cases of the deadly virus that were registered is a doctor who had been among the medics treating Patrick Sawyer, the Liberian-American man who died on July 25, days after arriving in Nigeria. Results of tests for the disease are set to be announced for three other people who also treated Sawyer and begin to demonstrate symptoms.

In New York City on Monday, Mount Sinai Hospital officials said they were testing a man for Ebola who recently returned from West Africa with a high fever and gastrointestinal distress.

African troops deployed to contain potentially ‘catastrophic’ Ebola outbreak

Currently, the virus is killing about 60 per cent of those infected.

On Monday, the WHO put the death toll at 887 in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria, with more 1,600 infected.

Last week, the organization started a $100 million plan to deal with the deadly virus. On Monday, during the US-Africa Leaders’ Summit, international development banks pledged to provide $260 million in emergency loans for Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

Hundreds of troops were deployed in Sierra Leone and Liberia on Monday to quarantine communities affected by the deadly Ebola virus due to panic in local population, with threats aimed at health workers, Reuters reported. Source

 

Add that to this and one has to wonder

A must watch video

Many Nazi Scientist were imported by the US through Operation Paper Clip.

It is just miraculous that all of a sudden, there may be a vaccine to cure Ebola.

Well I am guessing, if you think you have a cure you need victims to test it on.

Who in their right mind, would bring an Ebola victim into their country??

That would be insanity.

Recent

Man from Newfoundland wants Prime Minister Charged for Advocating Genocide against The Palestinians!

The Truth about Gaza 2014

 

 

Published in: on August 5, 2014 at 3:09 pm  Comments Off on ‘Secret serum’: Experimental Ebola drug used to treat 2 US aid workers  
Tags: , , , , ,

Starvation slams Haiti: Kids dying after 4 storms ravage crops, livestock

December 7 2008

BY JACQUELINE CHARLES

BAIE D’ORANGE, Haiti

The slow road to death runs high above the scenic coastline, past the crumbled bridges and buried rivers. It traverses a jagged trail passing green slopes and red fertile dirt before arriving here: an isolated mountain village where little Haitian girls dream of eating rice and the doctor is a three-hour walk away.

This is the place where children, suffering from stunted growth, look half their age, where struggling mothers cry that their half-starved babies with the brittle orange hair — evidence of malnutrition — neither crawl nor walk.

“He doesn’t cry, ‘Manman.’ Or ‘Papa,’ ” says Christmene Normilus, holding her malnourished 2-year-old son, Jean-Roselle Tata.

Emergency intervention
In the past month, international aid workers and doctors have airlifted 46 children on the brink of death from this southeastern village and neighboring communities to hospitals in Port-au-Prince, and elsewhere in the south.

The emergency intervention came after it was reported that 26 children from the Baie d’Orange region had died from severe malnutrition in the wake of the four successive storms that devastated Haiti in less than a month this summer.

But long before the deaths and hospitalizations plunged this poverty-stricken nation into the global spotlight amid fears of storm-related famine, the people of this farming community already were battling hunger.

Proud, they reluctantly admit that it is becoming increasingly difficult for them to feed their children, many of whom already suffer from chronic malnutrition.

Their story is repeated throughout the countryside, where a lack of roads, potable water and public-health facilities, as well as deforestation, already had Haiti’s rural poor living in life-threatening misery before the four back-to-back storms washed out more roads, killed livestock and wiped out crops.

“We can’t give our children what they need,” said Jilesca Fulcal, 37, a mother of seven who recently sought medical care for her 2-year-old son, Jean-Samuel Jules. “There is no food. No work for the people. The children can’t live like that. The children are suffering in their mothers’ arms.”

In recent weeks, the United Nations World Food Program has delivered food to the region, taking care to treat the children who are severely malnourished. But with many parts of the hilly hinterland accessible only by foot and horseback, residents say some people still have no access to the food.

Unseen suffering
Unlike Port-au-Prince, where Haiti’s crushing poverty is visible in the crowded slums and on the streets, the misery here is through what visitors don’t see: the eight- to 10-hour walk for water because there are no rivers, able-bodied young men toiling in the fields, the daily struggle to find food — including three hours to walk 12 miles on a rugged road to see the doctor.

“What’s happening in Baie d’Orange is the result of poor political decision-making that has happened over several years,” said Fednel Zidor, the government delegate for the southeast, who has gone on the radio to bring attention to the community’s plight. “No one paid any attention to it.”

Source

A bit of history.

January 7 2005

Photos: © 2005 Haiti Information Project – A UN armored personnel vehicle rolls through Delmas 2 in Bel Air. Five people were killed on January 5 when the UN entered the pro-Lavalas neighborhood under the pretext of cleaning the streets of garbage. Although the UN force took advantage of several photo opportunities to show their public works projects yesterday, their only duty on January 5 was to enter the roiling slum on heavily armed patrols. ©2004 Haiti Information ProjectOn October 28, 2004, the Haitian police entered the slum of Bel Air and shot these four young men execution style. Now that the UN controls Bel Air, members of Aristide’s Lavalas party demanded the UN stop the police and the former military from committing more murders in their communities. Some residents decided to leave Bel Air after the UN assumed control of the streets on January 5, 2005. Although the UN claims responsibility for security, members of Lavalas accuse the multinational force of allowing the Haitian National Police  to execute armed raids in poor neighborhoods where support for ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide remains strong. Despite UN claims of having entered Bel Air with force on January 5th to clear the streets of trash, other than a few carefully planned photo opportunites with the Associated Press, there was little evidence of progress the next day.

A UN armored personnel vehicle rolls through a nearly deserted street in the neighborhood of Bel Air. Residents claim five persons were killed on January 5, 2005 when the UN invaded the slum with hundreds of Brazilian troops under the guise of street cleaning and civic improvement projects

UN occupies Bel Air in Haiti
Port au Prince, Haiti Hundreds of Brazilian soldiers and special units of the Haitian National Police stormed the pro-Aristide neighborhood of Bel Air in the early morning hours of January 5. Residents were surprised and frightened by the armed incursion as gunfire broke out. Witnesses reported that five persons were killed as the operation unfolded.

Bel Air is a slum in the capital of Port au Prince that has served as a launching site for demonstrations demanding the return of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Aristide was ousted last February 29th amid charges he was kidnapped by U.S. Marines and remains in exile in the Republic of South Africa. The Bel Air slum had been under siege by police since violence erupted last September 30th after police opened fire on unarmed demonstrators.

Following the military operation, UN peacekeepers were seen providing photo opportunities to the press as they fixed a few water pipes and cleared the carcasses of burned out vehicles blocking the road. One resident who refused to give their name fearing reprisals stated, “Do you think we want to live like this? We are more afraid of the police coming in here and killing everyone than we are of the rats and the garbage. Those wrecked cars were our security because it stopped the police from coming in here at night and shooting us. Now that the UN has opened the door for them we don’t know what is going to happen to us. Look what they did in Cite de Dieu yesterday.”

The UN incursion came one day after Haitian police were accused of committing another deadly raid in a neighborhood close to Haiti’s National Theater. In Cite de Dieu the police reportedly killed six people including a 16 year-old girl and later justified the slaughter claiming they were bandits.

An unidentified representative of Aristide’s Lavalas party commented on the situation, “If the UN is really going to provide security to our communities then they must stop the police from murdering our citizens. We all want peace but you cannot blame people for wanting to defend themselves while the UN allows the police to commit murder and fill the jails with political prisoners. They must stop the police and the former military from murdering our citizens.

“Last October 28th the police executed four young men they thought were Lavalas and the UN did nothing to stop them.

“The UN cannot on one-hand say they are bringing security while on the other they claim to be assisting the police as they kill us, beat us and arrest us. It is a contradiction they must resolve or there will never be peace. They must control the police and stop the killing! They must support us in releasing all the political prisoners filling our jails!

“For now, it appears the UN are equally responsible for this partisan campaign to exterminate Lavalas that is clearly meant to silence our opposition to the coup of February 29, 2004.”

Source

San Francisco Bay Area Journalist Kevin Pina Held in Haiti

by Leisa Faulkner
September 12, 2005

Reporter Kevin Pina opened his family home to me last month in Port au Prince, Haiti when violence closed the orphanage where I usually stay to do human rights work. Tonight, Kevin sleeps in a jail cell like those I visited in Cap Haitian just weeks ago. He has become part of the story he risks his life daily to tell.

UN works to squash followers of Aristide in Haiti Port-au-Prince, Haiti Corralling residents and kicking down doors, heavily armed troops of the UN and the Police Nationale de Haiti invaded several neighborhoods of Cite Soleil one day after an alleged attack on the headquarters of the mission of the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul. Jan 9

Deaths reported as UN enters Haiti slum Port au Prince, Haiti Sustained and heavy gunfire erupted in the pro-Aristide slum of Cite Soleil at about 3 a.m. this morning and was followed by an incursion into the area by hundreds of Brazilian and Jordanian troops of the United Nations. – Dec 14 2004

Tearing up the Charter: UN’s Erosion Continues in Haiti Flashpoints Radio’s Dennis Bernstein interviews Kevin Pina and Brian Concannon. Oct 18 2004


Council On Hemispheric Affairs

Aiding Oppression in Haiti: Kofi Annan and General Heleno’s Complicity in Latortue’s Jackal Regime Dec 16 2004

Haiti’s Ship Sails on Without a Captain and With a Very Disreputable Crew: Kofi Annan, Roger Noriega, Colin Powell and Lula of Brazil have much to answer for failing to implement the UN’s Stabilization Mission – Dec 9

Brazil’s Peacekeeping Mission in Haiti: Doing God’s or Washington’s Work? -Dec 6

Oh, When All is Looted & Pillaged, Your Hunger Will Remain
February 28 2004
When President Bush took to the airwaves on Wednesday of this week, touting his Haitian counter-exodus measures, my suspicions of a repeat of 1991s coup d’etat were confirmed. The Coast Guard is to establish a wet line-of-defense, protecting the Cuban Shangri-La of Miami from boatloads of greasy, AIDS infected, odiferous Haitians. A carte blanche gifted to the water patrol units, granting cutter vessels total amnesty from any outcry resulting from dubious repatriation practices. The message was clear; this country will not tolerate another influx of non-European immigrants, especially those who defied our French brethren 200 years past.

Canada The Coup Coalition
March 7 2004
It looks like Paul Martin is already putting his mark on foreign affairs, with a shameful pandering to America in this. It was interesting to watch the hesitation in Foreign Affairs as the old hands working to save democracy in Haiti got the rug pulled out from under them by what Jamaica is already calling “new Canadians” – not meant to imply an improved version. I guess the business at any price types in the Liberal party have finally gotten their way.
So Americans, have no fear, or minor annoyance anyway – Canada will once again help hold the bag for you while you fill it with the corpses of anyone who dares to oppose your God given right to tell everyone else in the world how to manage their economy and live their lives.

Operation Enduring Sweatshop Another Bush Brings Hell to Haiti
March 10 2004

This week, the Bush administration added another violent “regime change” notch to its gunbelt, toppling the democratically elected president of Haiti and replacing him with an unelected gang of convicted killers, death squad leaders, militarists, narcoterrorists, CIA operatives, hereditary elitists and corporate predators – a bit like Team Bush itself, in other words.

Hidden from the Headlines
Haiti After the Coup The Final Chapter Has Yet To Be Written

When Hidden from the Headlines was first published in August 2003, we wrote: Since the election of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 2000, the United States has moved to sabotage Haiti’s fledgling democracy through an economic aid embargo, massive funding of elite opposition groups, support for paramilitary coup attempts, and a propaganda offensive against the Aristide government. Hidden from the headlines for years, this campaign has now become an open effort to destroy a popularly elected, progressive government.

And I am sure the Sanctions they were under also helped them into extreme poverty as well.

Haitian children died from severe malnutrition

Poverty crushing the People of Haiti /History on Sanctions

Save the Children has served the needs of some of Haiti’s poorest children and families since 1985. Today, through advocacy, by reinforcing government social services and supporting community-based development programs in protection, education, health, food security, livelihoods and humanitarian relief, we are improving the lives of some 425,000 children and adults in urban and rural communities in six provinces and 33 districts. To better serve the great needs of children and best use the vital resources of our donors, Save the Children recently merged programs and activities with other members of the International Save the Children Alliance who also have programs in Haiti.

Challenges for Children

Of all the nations in the Western Hemisphere, none faces greater challenges to improve the lives of its children than Haiti. In addition to its poor development indicators, Haiti is the country most affected by HIV/AIDS outside of sub-Saharan Africa, which aggravates the well-being of children whose health is already compromised by poverty and inadequate access to basic health care.

Improving the health, education and food security of poor children and women.
Improving the health, education and food security of poor children and women.

Numbers at a Glance

  • Average life expectancy in Haiti is 52 years.
  • Under-5 mortality rate is 120 per 1,000 live births.
  • Some 3.8 percent of the population is believed to be HIV positive, among them 17,000 children.
  • Some 500,000 girls and boys are out of school and some 300,000 children live in domestic servitude.

Our Response

Protection: In urban areas, including the capital of Port-au-Prince, Save the Children supports welcome centers for street children that provide food and shelter, education and health programs and counseling and play opportunities. Centers offer scholarship assistance so that children can attend school and provide on-site lessons to prepare children for formal schooling. Save the Children also supports children’s rights through direct local interventions and national advocacy. Through a network of children’s clubs, we educate girls and boys on their rights, offers recreational youth activities and endorse positive civic participation.

Education: Save the Children implements a rural education program in over 200 community, government and mission schools. Through it, we reach over 22,000 students in Haiti’s Central Plateau, Southeast and Artibonite regions. We advocate for state recognition and more resources for the country’s growing network of community-run schools. We also pilot school readiness programs for pre-school girls and boys to increase their chances for later educational success.  Primary children benefit from our school health and nutrition activities, receiving de-worming medication, iodine, iron supplementation and hygiene training, all of which help them stay in school. Innovative radio learning programs further extend the reach of our educational initiatives. And, Haiti is also part of Save the Children’s Rewrite the Future campaign to support education in conflict-affected countries.

Community Health: In partnership with the Ministry of Health, Save the Children provides quality primary health care to mothers and young children in the Artibonite and Central provinces. We help prevent and treat malaria, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases. We also train health care workers, invest in health infrastructure and medical equipment and develop community-based health committees to promote local participation and community well-being. In addition, we vaccinate children, provide them with supplemental vitamins and micronutrients, promote the benefits of breastfeeding and address childhood illnesses such as diarrhea. Save the Children projects also increase access to potable drinking water and oral re-hydration therapies. Reproductive health activities promote family planning, pre- and post-natal visits, safe deliveries and sexual education.

HIV/AIDS: Save the Children implements an HIV/AIDS program which has been greatly scaled up over the past year. Its goals are to improve access to prevention services and testing and counseling, mobilize community support for orphans and vulnerably children, improve the management of antiretroviral treatment programs and develop a coordinated system of care in the Artibonite, Central, Western and Nippes provinces. Activities include: mobilizing communities to assist persons living with and affected by HIV/AIDS; prevention of mother-to-child transmission; and promotion of safer sexual practices among youth. We help form local support groups and health committees and organize public awareness campaigns such as weekly radio broadcasts. Save the Children also leads a consortium of other organizations which is expanding HIV/AIDS programs into disadvantaged rural areas.

Food Security: Save the Children helps improve the nutritional status of children in eight districts in the Central and Artibonite provinces. We monitor children’s nutrition, provide food to pregnant and lactating women, children under age 2 and malnourished children; improve community health and nutrition practices and promote improved agricultural production and marketing to bolster local economic growth.

Humanitarian Relief: Save the Children provides humanitarian relief and child-centered assistance for children and families affected by natural disasters. Over the past five years, we also have conducted community-based disaster preparedness and mitigation activities.

Sponsorship: In Haiti, Save the Children sponsors are one of our most important resources. Through this support, we improve the lives of thousands of children every year by providing primary education and school health and nutrition programs in the Maïssade district in the Central Plateau. We are currently exploring expansion possibilities to other regions.

Looking Forward for Children

Save the Children continues to integrate its protection, education, primary health care, HIV/AIDS prevention and food security programs, while promoting household economic growth activities in communities. We also plan to broaden our impact through expanded geographic coverage in both urban and rural areas and increase our advocacy work for children’s rights.

More Teachers Help Make a Difference for Mona

Like many children from the community of Maissade, Mona began attending the local public school when she was 6. She is now in 3rd grade, but despite good attendance and health, Mona did not pass the tests that would have promoted her to the next grade. Save the Children learned that the school Mona attended had six classrooms managed by only one director and one teacher.

Save the Children responds to the shortage of teachers in public schools by training and placing new teachers in classrooms. In partnership with a local university and the Ministry of Education, high school graduates receive intensive teacher training followed by an assignment to a classroom that previously had no teacher.

The increased teacher-student ratio has made a difference in the quality of learning for Mona. She passed all of her exams; many girls just like Mona are advancing to the next grades.

Loudouide and Friends: A Chance to Attend School

“Because of Save the Children, all the children in my community can go to school and I am happy about that.”

Loudouide and her family live in a remote part of Maïssade District, an eight-hour drive from the capital of Port-au-Prince. In a country where half a million children do not go to school because their families cannot afford to send them, and only 2 percent finish secondary education, Loudouide and her village friends are benefiting from a golden opportunity – a chance to attend school.

Thanks to our community schools initiative, there has been a 20 percent increase in the number of children attending school in the areas where we work. In a country where nearly one person in every two is illiterate, this presents a life-changing opportunity for children such as Loudouide and her friends, their families and community.

Donate now to support Save the Children’s work in the U.S. and around the world

Large sections of Haiti’s population, particularly in the capital, Port-au- Prince, live in precarious conditions due to poverty, neglect, urban violence and lack of access to basic healthcare. Violence continues, especially in Martissant, where MSF treated over 200 gunshot injuries. An MSF survey between January 2006 to July 2007 showed that nearly one in four deaths in Martissant was related to violence.

Violence and conflict
Since December 2006, MSF has operated an emergency health center in Martissant, a neighborhood characterized by daily violence and a lack of medical facilities. Every day, patients are referred from the emergency health center to the other hospitals where MSF works. MSF established a number of mobile clinics in the heart of the Martissant neighborhoods, with medical teams offering primary healthcare to some 400 patients a day.

At the end of 2007, MSF handed over its project in the slum of Cité Soleil, where the security situation has improved, to the Ministry of Health. The project started in July 2005 to guarantee access to care for victims of the violence. The ongoing presence of MSF teams, even during the most intense fighting, resulted in 72,000 consultations at the primary health center of Chapi and 32,000 at Choscal hospital, where more than 13,000 patients were hospitalized. However, since April the situation has got better, with no patient with a bullet wound seen at the Tuscaloosa hospital and people in the neighborhood no longer living in fear and isolation.

MSF continued to provide medical and surgical care at its Trinite trauma center in Port-au- Prince, admitting more than 14,000 patients compared with 11,000 in 2006. The number of admissions for gunshot wounds fell from 1,300 in 2006 to 500 in 2007, although the number of victims of stab wounds, rape and beatings continued to rise. In total, 2,847 patients were admitted for violence-related trauma.

Throughout the year, MSF medical teams focused on improving quality of care, working to perfect the recently introduced surgical technique of orthopedic internal fixation. A total of 205 patients benefited from this technique, which sharply reduced their length of stay in hospital.

MSF also operates a physical rehabilitation center where patients needing specialized post-operative treatment can receive physiotherapy and psychological care.

In June, MSF increased its capacity to treat victims of sexual violence in the capital, offering comprehensive psychological and medical treatment. The program treated 242 victims between July 2006 and June 2007. Awareness campaigns emphasizing confidentiality and the need to seek treatment within 72 hours resumed in July in the shantytowns and city center.

Maternal health needs
Maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the western hemisphere (approximately 630 women die for 100,000 births), mainly due to eclampsia. The insecure urban slum environment where many women live limits their access to healthcare as physical and sexual violence, extortion and common crime are serious threats.

In 2006, the emergency maternal Jude Ann hospital was opened in Port-au-Prince, the only hospital in Haiti to offer free emergency obstetric care. By the end of 2007, over 13,000 women had given birth here. MSF also started providing services in fixed clinics in selected slum communities, with ante- and post-natal care and a referral service in the three slums of La Saline, Pelé Simon and Solino. Mental health services will be added in 2008.

MSF has worked in Haiti since 1991.

More Reports or to Donate

Zimbabwe Appeal: First cholera. Now it’s malaria and anthrax

Our special correspondent reports from Mashonaland West, where Zimbabwe’s hard-pressed doctors are doing all they can to stop the spread of disease

December 7 2008

Kitty, 19, on the one usable bed in the Mashonaland West clinic where she is being treated for cholera. Zimbabwe's desperate food shortage has made the outbreak even more lethal than usual

RACHEL DWYER

Kitty, 19, on the one usable bed in the Mashonaland West clinic where she is being treated for cholera. Zimbabwe’s desperate food shortage has made the outbreak even more lethal than usual

The folding bed on which the cholera patient lay was the only piece of furniture in the room. The bag of 5 per cent dextrose fluid going into her arm had to be tied to the metal window frame, in which half the panes were broken, because the isolation camp had no drip stands. But 19-year-old Kitty was fortunate, in more ways than one.

The high-school student was the only cholera patient in the camp, set up in two derelict brick houses in a remote area of the Zambezi River valley, to have a bed. Other patients had to lie on the floor, with just a blanket between them and the bare concrete. Save the Children had donated two special cholera beds, which can easily be disinfected between patients, but a 60-year-old woman had died in the other one earlier in the day. Her body lay on the floor in another room, wrapped in blankets.

Cholera is extremely infectious – Kitty and her grandfather, also a patient in the camp, had both contracted the disease at the funeral of another victim – but easily treatable if caught in time. “I feel better already,” said the young woman, just over 12 hours after she was admitted. Nobody had the heart, however, to tell her that her grandfather was not expected to last the day. Like many older patients, he had suffered kidney failure, caused by acute dehydration.

It is a measure of Zimbabwe’s collapse under President Robert Mugabe that cholera has been allowed to get out of control. Last week his government finally stopped playing down the worst epidemic in decades, and declared a national emergency. More than 12,000 people have been infected, and nearly 600 have died, according to official figures, but health professionals believe the real totals are much higher. Food shortages and economic collapse have crippled the country’s health services so badly that many unrecorded deaths are thought to have occurred in remote areas, beyond the reach of treatment.

Nor is that the only reason why the disease has taken hold. In several cases, starving rural people have failed to report suspected cases of cholera, because they know that the authorities will immediately ban public gatherings, and wrongly believe that this will extend to food distributions. Only when victims start dying does the news get out, and by then infection has spread far and wide.

Cholera is endemic in parts of Mashonaland West, and there are well-established procedures for dealing with the disease, which usually makes its appearance much later in the rainy season, in March or April. Isolation camps are immediately set up at the scene of an outbreak, and are not closed until 14 days after the last case is declared over. But one rural doctor said there was simply not enough food for the staff, let alone the patients, to set up the number of camps required in his area. “We are just firefighting,” he said.

Steady rain was falling as we arrived at Kitty’s isolation camp, set up next to a clinic that had never been completed, because desperate local people had stolen building materials to sell for food. Before entering, we had to retie our shoelaces to ensure they did not brush the floor, and afterwards our shoes were disinfected. Only a timely donation of maize meal from Save the Children had allowed this camp to stay open, but Kitty’s luck did not end there.

Unlike one family, in which a woman lost her mother and three of her four children in two days, the 19-year-old had recognised her symptoms straight away, and when she arrived, the camp had enough intravenous fluids and antibiotics to treat her. The doctor said he knew of at least two cases of patients dying because supplies of fluid had run out, and after the first few cases, the local laboratory had exhausted its supply of the reagents needed to test patients for cholera. “I must be the most frustrated doctor in Zimbabwe,” he said.

If anything, conditions are even worse in the urban areas. Roughly half the deaths have been in the capital, Harare, where sewage runs down the streets in many poor districts. The water supply has been cut off to much of the city, because the municipality cannot pay for the chemicals to treat it. With monthly salaries for medical staff barely covering the cost of a single day’s bus fare to and from work, all Harare’s hospitals have ceased functioning. Last week riot police broke up a demonstration by doctors and nurses demanding better pay and conditions.

Even if a massive infusion of international aid brings the cholera outbreak under control, however, doctors fear that an equally fatal epidemic of malaria will soon follow. In a tropical country such as Zimbabwe, some cases of malaria can be expected every year. But in the low-lying Zambezi Valley there used to be a network of modestly paid community health workers who would cut the grass in which mosquitoes breed, and spray each house ahead of the summer rains, helping to keep the disease under control. That system broke down a couple of years ago, and the number of cases shot up last summer. With this year’s rains, the situation is expected to be even worse.

Another deadly disease, anthrax, has already made an appearance in north-western Zimbabwe, and has spread from animals to humans, because hungry villagers have eaten the meat of infected cattle. At least three people have died in the worst anthrax outbreak since the liberation war of the 1970s. More deaths are likely, because administrative disarray means the strict quarantine and slaughter system needed to defeat the disease is unlikely to be implemented. Inoculation of livestock against the disease all but stopped five years ago.

All these health disasters are on top of the ravages of HIV/Aids. Zimbabwe has one of the highest infection rates in the world, but progress was being made. Thanks to huge efforts by the Global Fund, anti-retroviral drugs have been widely distributed, but they are ineffective unless the person taking them is adequately fed.

In every case it is the children who are most vulnerable. David and Tambu’s nine-year-old daughter Sarah showed symptoms of cholera at 4am, and by the same evening she was dead – probably, according to a doctor, because she was undernourished and had latent malaria as well. “She had been playing with children from a village where there was cholera,” said David, who carried Sarah on his back for three hours to reach the nearest clinic. “We all went to church on Sunday, and on Monday she was dead. If the clinic here had still been running, perhaps she might have lived, but it closed a long time ago.”

For Tambu, who was heavily pregnant with another child, the cruelest blow was that her daughter’s body was returned to them encased in heavy plastic, to prevent infection. “If I had at least been able to see her one more time, it would have helped me grieve,” she said. “I don’t know how to tell the other children what has happened.” Her fears for the family are growing, because they are dependent on food handouts. “We have traded our cooking pots for something to eat, and have nothing left to barter with,” she said. “If no more food comes, we will die.”

The doctor, who had been unable to save Sarah’s life, said: “Cholera, malaria and deaths in childbirth are all easily preventable. Save the Children is a very strong pillar for us – compared with other districts, we lose far fewer people to these causes.” Never, though, have the ordinary people of Zimbabwe been in greater need than now, and we are their only source of hope.

Some names have been changed

Anatomy of a killer

* Cholera, a bacterial infection, results from poor hygiene and contaminated water or food. It is common in crowded, insanitary environments, such as pre-20th-century London.

* One of the earliest breakthroughs in public health came when a cholera outbreak was traced to an infected well in Soho, London, in 1854.

* The disease causes massive diarrhoea and vomiting in its most virulent form, leading to dehydration and kidney failure. It can kill in as little as three hours if not treated.

* Cholera is easily treated by oral rehydration and antibiotics. But the disease will kill more than half those infected if left to run its course.

How you can help

Our Christmas Appeal has already raised over £10,000, but much more is still needed.

£5 will buy a mosquito net to protect a child from malaria.

£40 will buy a kit to treat a cholera patient with a drip, fluid and drugs.

£66 will build a safe toilet to prevent disease spreading.

£230 will fund a borehole and water pump so a village has clean water.

£660 will set up an isolation camp to treat cholera victims safely, and stop the disease from being spread.

You can also pledge at www.independent.co.uk/iosappeal

Source

UN forced to cut food aid to Zimbabwe’s starving people

Half a million will go without emergency handouts this month, and more will be hungry in January. Meanwhile, Gordon Brown says it’s time to tell Mugabe ‘enough is enough’

By a special correspondent in Zimbabwe
December 7 2008

Zimbabwean villagers have resorted to selling wild berries by the side of the road to buy food

EPA

Zimbabwean villagers have resorted to selling wild berries by the side of the road to buy food

Half a million people in Zimbabwe will go without food handouts this month, the UN agency responsible for feeding more than two-fifths of the country’s population warned yesterday, as shortages of funds force further cuts in rations.

“We are still four months away from the [maize] harvest. We haven’t seen the worst yet,” Richard Lee, a spokesman for the UN World Food Programme (WFP) in Johannesburg, told The Independent on Sunday. “The situation has worsened more quickly than expected. We have reduced rations in December, and will have to do so again in January.”

The food crisis has contributed to the rapid spread of the cholera epidemic now ravaging the country. So far nearly 600 people have died and more than 12,000 have been infected, according to the authorities, but the real figures are believed to be much higher as the disease takes its toll among people weakened by hunger.

The WFP expects 5.1 million Zimbabweans – well over half the nine million people remaining in the country – to need food aid by January. The target for this month was 4.2 million, but rations for only 3.7 million are available. “Rather than excluding entire households from the distribution, we have decided to set a maximum of six rations per household,” Mr Lee said. “Families with more than that number of mouths to feed will have to share.” In November the monthly ration per person was cut from 12kg of maize meal to 10kg, and from 1.8kg of beans to 1kg.

Drought this year drastically increased Zimbabwe’s food deficit. The rains have been good so far this season, but the country’s economic collapse means the area planted with grain is well below what is needed to feed the population. The WFP says it needs an extra $100m (£68m) to cover the shortfall up to March 2009.

With millions of Zimbabweans starving and cholera raging, Gordon Brown called on the international community yesterday to tell President Robert Mugabe that “enough is enough”, saying: “The whole world is angry because they see avoidable deaths – of children, mothers, and families… This is a humanitarian catastrophe. This is a breakdown in civil society. It is a blood-stained regime that is letting down its own people.”

As cholera spills across Zimbabwe’s borders into neighbouring countries, Mr Brown said the crisis was an “international rather than a national emergency” that demanded a co-ordinated response. Since there was no administration willing or able to protect the people, Mr Brown said a “command and control structure” should be put in place in the capital, Harare, to manage aid efforts.

Mr Mugabe is not expected to heed Mr Brown’s call – if anything, he is likely to use it as proof of his claim that Britain is seeking to recolonise Zimbabwe. The population is constantly told that its problems are due to sanctions imposed by Britain and the US, though in fact these are targeted only at the leadership. But the Mr Brown’s strongest statement yet on Zimbabwe echoes growing anger in Africa at the death toll caused by the cholera epidemic and the political and economic breakdown from which it stems.

Desmond Tutu, the Nobel peace laureate, said last week that Mr Mugabe was “destroying a wonderful country” and should be deposed by force if he refused to step down. Kenya’s Prime Minister, Raila Odinga, said earlier: “It’s time for African governments to take decisive action to push him out of power.”

Mr Brown did not explicitly call yesterday for Mr Mugabe to step down, but on Friday the US Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice, said his departure from office was long overdue: “The fact is there was a sham election; there has been a sham process of power-sharing talks and now we are seeing not only political and economic total devastation… but a humanitarian toll of the cholera epidemic.”

Source

So did they really cut off aid because of a shortage or because they want to oust Mugabe?

Sanctions can and do kill innocent citizens in every country where they have been implemented. They cause extreme hardship to the people.  Sanctions cause numerous problems. Illness, poverty, starvation and the list goes on and on. They can and do cripple countries and the people in them.

Also Doctors  Without Boarder and Save the Children are taking Donations.  Both are also helping in Zimbabwe. Links to their sites are on posts below.

Zimbabwe: Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières

Save the Children Donates To Zimbabwe Crisis

Zimbabwe runs out of water-Public desperation is increasing

Now anthrax takes toll on the starving in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe declares national health emergency

Zimbabwe’s cholera epidemic hits 10,000 to 11,000 and rising

Published in: on December 7, 2008 at 7:56 am  Comments Off on Zimbabwe Appeal: First cholera. Now it’s malaria and anthrax  
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,