Saudi Arabian Prince defects

Saudi prince defects: ‘Brutality, oppression as govt scared of Arab revolts’ 

 August 12, 2013

Saudi Arabia, a major supporter of opposition forces in Syria, has increased crackdown on its own dissenters, with 30,000 activists reportedly in jail. In an exclusive interview to RT a Saudi prince defector explained what the monarchy fears most.

Saudi Arabia has stepped up arrests and trials of peaceful dissidents, and responded with force to demonstrations by citizens,” Human Rights Watch begins the country’s profile on its website.

Political parties are banned in Saudi Arabia and human rights groups willing to function legally have to go no further than investigating things like corruption or inadequate services. Campaigning for political freedoms is outlawed.

One of such groups, which failed to get its license from the government, the Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association (ACPRA), was cited by AFP as saying the kingdom was holding around 30,000 political prisoners.

Saudi Prince Khaled Bin Farhan Al-Saud, who spoke to RT from Dusseldorf, Germany, confirmed reports of increased prosecution of anti-government activists and said that it’s exactly what forced him to defect from his family. He accused the monarchy of corruption and silencing all voices of dissent and explained how the Saudi mechanism for suppression functioned.

There is no independent judiciary, as both police and the prosecutor’s office are accountable to the Interior Ministry. This ministry’s officials investigate ‘crimes’ (they call them crimes), related to freedom of speech. So they fabricate evidence, don’t allow people to have attorneys”, the prince told RT Arabic. “Even if a court rules to release such a ‘criminal’, the Ministry of Interior keeps him in prison, even though there is a court order to release him. There have even been killings! Killings! And as for the external opposition, Saudi intelligence forces find these people abroad! There is no safety inside or outside the country.”

The strong wave of oppression is in response to the anti-government forces having grown ever more active. A new opposition group called Saudi Million and claiming independence from any political party was founded in late July. The Saudi youths which mostly constitute the movement say they demand the release of political prisoners and vow to hold regular demonstrations, announcing their dates and locations via Facebook and electronic newspapers.

Human rights violations are driving people on to the streets despite the fear of arrest, according to activist Hala Al-Dosari, who spoke to RT from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

We have issues related to political and civil rights, freedom of expression and freedom of assembly. These are the main issues that cause a lot of people to be at risk for just voicing out their opinions or trying to form associations, demonstrate or protest, which is banned by the government.”

The loudest voice of the Saudi opposition at the moment is a person called ‘Saudi Assange’. His Twitter name is @Mujtahidd, he keeps his identity and whereabouts secret and is prolific in online criticism of the ruling family, which has gained him over a million followers.

The regime can destroy your credibility easily and deter people from dealing with you if your identity is public,” Mujtahid wrote to RT’s Lindsay France in an email.

Prince Khalid Bin Farhan Al-Saud announced his defection from the Saudi Arabian royal family on July 27.

They don’t think about anything but their personal benefits and do not care for the country’s and people’s interests, or even national security,” his statement reads as cited by the website of Tehran-based Al Alam International News Channel.

The prince criticized the royal family for silencing all voices calling for reforms and said he learned of the common Saudis’ sufferings having gone through “horrible personal experience,” without specifying exactly what it was.

The Twitter activist’s anonymity is understandable. The most recent example of what can happen to activists is the case of Raif Badawi, the founder of the Free Saudi Liberals website, who was found guilty of insulting Islam through his online forum and sentenced the activist to 600 lashes and seven years in prison.

In June, seven people were sentenced to up to 10 years in prison for ‘inciting protests’ via Facebook. The indicted denied charges and said they were tortured into confession.

The government is obviously scared of the Arab revolutions. And they’ve responded as they usually do: by resorting to oppression, violence, arbitrary law, and arrest,” Prince Khaled says, adding that so far the tougher the measures the government took to suppress the dissent, the louder that dissent’s voice was.

The opposition used to demand wider people’s representation in governing bodies, more rights and freedoms. But the authorities reacted with violence and persecution, instead of a dialogue. So the opposition raised the bar. It demanded constitutional monarchy, similar to what they have in the UK, for example. And the Saudi regime responded with more violence. So now the bar is even higher. Now the opposition wants this regime gone.”

There was a time, at the beginning of the Arab Spring movement in the region in 2011, when the government tried to appease opposition activists by a $60 billion handout program by King Abdullah, according to Pepe Escobar, a correspondent for the Asia Times. He calls that move an attempt to “bribe” the population. However there was also a stick with this carrot.

The stick is against the Shiite minority – roughly 10 percent of Saudi Arabia – who live in the Eastern province where most of the oil is, by the way. They don’t want to bring down the House of Saud essentially. They want more participation, judiciary not answering to religious powers and basically more democratic freedoms. This is not going to happen in Saudi Arabia. Period. Nor in the other Gulf Cooperation Council [GCC] petro-monarchies”.

Escobar points out the hypocrisy of the Saudi Arabian rulers, who feel free to advise other regional powers on how to move towards democracy, despite their poor human rights record.

They say to the Americans that they are intervening in Syria for a more democratic post-Assad Syria and inside Saudi Arabia it’s the Sunni-Shiite divide. They go against 10 percent of their own population.”

‘Buying favors from West’

Saudi Arabia’s crackdown on opposition has been strongly condemned by human rights organizations, but not by Western governments, which usually claim sensitivity to such issues.

The White House certainly does maintain a long-standing alliance with the leaders of Saudi Arabia, cemented by common political, economic and military interests in the Middle East,” said Prince Khaled.

Germany came under fierce criticism last week over its arms sales to Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states, which have almost tripled in just two years, from 570 million euro in 2011 to almost one-and-a-half billion in 2012.

And Angela Merkel’s government has approved weapons exports of more than 800 million euro in the first half of this year – suggesting the level will continue to grow.

With arms they [Gulf States] are also buying favors from the West. They are insuring the maintenance of their legitimacy on spending massive amounts of money that are pouring into Western economies,” Dr. Ahmed Badawi, co-executive director of Transform, which studies conflicts and political developments, told RT.

In 2012, Amnesty International claimed that German-made small firearms, ammunition and military vehicles were commonly used by Middle Eastern and North African regimes to suppress peaceful demonstrations.

Small arms are becoming real weapons of mass destruction in the world now. There is absolutely no way to guarantee that the weapons that are being sold legally to countries like Saudi Arabia, even Egypt, do not fall into the hands of terrorists. The two important examples are German assault rifles found in the regions in Mexico and also in Libya. And there’s absolutely no way of knowing how these weapons ended up there,” Badawi said. Source  Videos at source.

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Published in: on August 12, 2013 at 1:48 pm  Comments Off on Saudi Arabian Prince defects  
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UK police in Hot Water

UK police under fire for seducing activists, stealing dead infants’ names

March 01, 2013

British MPs have condemned practices used by undercover police, including sleeping with those they were investigating and using dead infants’ names for their covert identity. The MPs have called for legislation to regulate undercover work.

The UK House of Commons held a Home Affairs Select Committee probe into a series of scandals involving undercover police officers. In an interim report published on Friday, the committee addressed three separate issues.

First: Undercover officers became intimate with those they were investigating. Second: The practice of using the names of dead infants to create cover identities for the officers. And last, but not least: MPs criticized the overall system of undercover police work.

Unauthorized, but ‘almost inevitable’ sex

The MPs highlighted several cases in which undercover officers infiltrated various activist groups and initiated long-term intimate relationships with members of those groups. The affairs were then broken off when the agents finished their work. Some incidents reviewed by the commission dated as far back as the 1980s.

Several of the women are now claiming damages over the incidents. While MPs refrained from commenting on the legality of the officers’ actions, “the terrible impact on the lives of those women who had relationships with undercover officers is beyond doubt,” they said, adding that the officers “were not unaffected” either.

“There is an alarming degree of inconsistency in the views of Ministers and senior police officers about the limits of what may and may not be lawfully authorized,” the report said. Officials offered MPs different views on whether such relationships were justified, could be prevented or should be banned outright. One official said such closeness “could almost be inevitable” is some cases.

One practical consideration, former Minister for Policing Nick Herbert explained, is that an explicit ban on such intimacy “would provide a ready-made test for the targeted criminal group to find out whether an undercover officer was deployed among them.” However, there must be strict rules for officers becoming intimate with their targets, the MPs said.

“We do not believe that officers should enter into intimate, physical sexual relationships while using their false identities undercover without clear, prior authorization, which should only be given in the most exceptional circumstances,” the report said.

The report outlined that it is clearly unacceptable to conceive a child as result of such relationships, which reportedly happened to one of the officers. “This must never be allowed to happen again,” the MPs said.AFP Photo / Carl de Souza)

‘Ghoulish and disrespectful’

Another dubious practice condemned by the MPs was the use of the names of dead infants to create aliases for undercover agents. The practice was “ghoulish and disrespectful,” and potentially dangerous to the bereaved families, they said.

One witness told the commission how she found the home address of the people she believed to be the parents of her missing partner, who was an undercover officer using a fake name. Her intention was not malevolent, but “it is easy to see how officers infiltrating serious, organized criminal and terrorist gangs using the identities of real people could pose a significant risk to the living relatives of those people,” the report stressed.

“The families who have been affected by this deserve an explanation and a full and unambiguous apology from the forces concerned,” the commission continued. “We would also welcome a clear statement from the Home Secretary that this practice will never be followed in future.” 

The Metropolitan Police is currently conducting an investigation into the use of dead infants’ names. To the shock of the commission, the practice was “apparently a surprise to senior officers and it is vital that the investigation establish quickly how high up the chain of command this practice was sanctioned,” the report said.

The commission pledged to request updates on the progress of the probe every three months, including the remaining amount of work, costs, disciplinary proceedings, arrests made, and the families involved being identified and informed. The probe should be concluded by the end of 2013, and the results will be published on the commission’s website every three months.

“It cannot be sufficiently emphasized that using the identities of dead children was not only abhorrent, but reflects badly on the police. It must never occur again,” the MPs said. (Reuters)

Reform pending

During the investigation, the MPs found that “standards in undercover operations are jeopardized by lack of clear lines of responsibility between… the different forces and units involved.” They cite discrepancies in training, tactics and review, and called for the establishment of a coherent set of operational instructions.

Of particular concern for the commission was the weak oversight for undercover agents who were gathering intelligence, and how there was no expectation that the evidence gathered must stand up in court.

The MPs argued that undercover police activity should be limited to genuine threats to public safety or national security. They also expressed doubts over the practice of infiltrating activist groups engaged in peaceful protest in the hopes of reaching more radical groups.

The report said that a compelling case exists for a fundamental review of the legislative framework governing undercover policing, including 2000’s Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act.

“We recommend that the Government commit to the publication of a Green Paper on the regulation of investigatory powers before the end of this Parliament, with a view to publishing draft legislation in the Session after the next general election,” the report said.

http://tiny.cc/nxuatw

Undercover police officers, that were really under the covers.

Read the  Report. It is a long read but what the witnesses have to say is heart breaking.  Imagine living with a fake Pearson for 5 or 6 years. They lived as a married couple would in some cases. So how would it feel to find out your husband was not real? Then he just vanished off the face of the earth. So you go to visit his parents etc. One did try that. Now if she had spoken to them they would have been shocked to find out that their son who died had his identity stolen.

There are so many things that could have happened by doing these types of thing it staggers the imagination.

What if and this was not the case as the people being investigated were not terrorists but if they had been or drug dealers etc. The parents may even have been killed. I could see a drug dealer going there to find the guy and his parents who were not even his parents getting caught up in the cross fire. In the US drive by shooting happen all the time and innocent people die.

They certainly did not think when they used the name of real children, with real parents and relatives.

In the 5 or 6 years  those police officers lived with these women they took that time from them. If not for the lies those women may have found a real partner. They may have found real love. That time can never be given back to those women. One wanted to have a child. Now she may or may not have that happen. She will have to find a new partner and by the time that happens it may be too late. How dare they steal years of a woman’s life in such a manner. Imagine finding out all those years you were just being used and it was all a lie. No wonder the sexual abuse in the UK is so bad, the police are part of it. Do read the Report.It is eye opening.

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmselect/cmhaff/837/837.pdf

Special Demonstration Squad, which was initially funded by the Home Office and set up in 1968, ran for 40 years.

A lot could have happened over those 40 years.

All I can say is if you don’t know who your Father is, he may be a police officer was working uncover in more ways then one. . That is something to ponder. Also 40 years ago birth control was not as efficient as it is today. Even with all the new types of birth control, they are not all 100% guaranteed to work. If it turns out the woman was left with a child to raise on her own that is unacceptable, in every sense of the word.

Sexual exploitation of any type is unacceptable, but when it is the police doing it, that is beyond words to explain the nightmare it leaves in the minds of those who were exploited and the loss of trust in the police who are suppose to protect individuals from such crimes. They have become the criminals, they are suppose to protect us from. Then they have the audacity, to question why the public does not trust them.

As a parent, if this was done to your daughter, how would you feel?

If anyone thinks this is acceptable behavior I would say you have a sick, criminal mind. This is sexual exploitation at it’s worst.

The women did not consent to to sleep with an undercover police officer they consented to sleep with a non existing person who had died years before. You cannot consent to have sexual relations with a person, who is a not real in any seance of the word.

True consent can only be given if the partner is real and who he or she says she is, other wise it is not consent.

If you steal someones identity and ran up credit card charges or other crimes using “identity theft”, they crimes are they not?

The police have done the same thing except they stole the lives of women for weeks, months and in some cases years using “identity theft”.

You cannot legally give consent to have a sexual relationship. with a person who does not exist, identity theft or other wise.

The more I think about this, the angrier I get.

Breach of Trust, Betrayal, Lies, Corruption, Theft, Coercion,  Sexual Exploitation, Fatherless children, Abuse of power, Disregard for another person or persons emotional or physical well being, Seduction, Endangerment of innocent people, Prostitution of oneself to get information (Yes and they got paid to do so, with tax dollars) and those are just off the top of my head.

Police spy Mark Kennedy may have misled parliament over relationships

Inquiry hears claims of 10 or more women having sexual relations with undercover officer who infiltrated eco-activists

Mark Kennedy, undercover police officer

Mark Kennedy-Fake Name :Mark Stone
Mark Kennedy’s evidence saying he had sexual relationships with two people is disputed by women taking legal action against the police. Photograph: Philipp Ebeling

Mark Kennedy, the police spy who infiltrated the environmental movement, appears to have misled parliament over the number of sexual relationships he had with women while he was working undercover.

Kennedy told a parliamentary inquiry that he had only two relationships during the seven years he spied on environmental groups.

However, at least four women had come forward to say that he slept with them when he was a police spy.

Friends who knew Kennedy when he was living as an eco-activist in Nottingham have identified more than 10 women with whom he slept.

Kennedy was the only undercover police officer to give evidence to the inquiry conducted by the home affairs select committee.

He testified in private, but transcripts of his evidence released on Thursday reveal that he claimed he had sexual relationships with “two individuals”.

But three women who say they are Kennedy’s former lovers are part of an 11-strong group taking legal action against police chiefs for damages.

The Guardian has been investigating this story for some time.

For more go HERE

Mark Jenner, the police spy who went by the name of Mark Cassidy for six years

Mark Jenner, the undercover officer in the Metropolitan police’s special demonstration squad, who went by the name of Mark Cassidy for six years – then disappeared.

He was called Mark Cassidy. His girlfriend – a secondary school teacher he shared a flat with for four years – believed they were almost “man and wife”. Then, in 2000, as the couple were discussing plans for the future, Cassidy suddenly vanished, never to be seen again. Source

Those are just who who victimized civilians. There are more.

Then we have this type of intrusive behavior. Child abuse under the Authority of the State.

43,000 strip-searches carried out on children as young as 12

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Published in: on March 2, 2013 at 3:43 am  Comments Off on UK police in Hot Water  
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Banking on Bloodshed: UK high street banks’ complicity in the arms trade

Banks, Corporations and Conflict

The arms trade provides the destructive hardware used in conflicts across the world. It undermines development, contributing to the poverty and suffering of millions.

A new report by War on Want, Banking on Bloodshed: UK high street banks’ complicity in the arms trade has exposed, for the first time, the extent to which the five main British high street banks are funding this violent trade.

Banking on Bloodshed

High street banks are using our money to fund companies that sell arms used against civilians in wars across the world, including the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. They are financing an industry that sells arms to countries committing human rights abuses such as Israel, Colombia and Saudi Arabia.

Money from our savings and current accounts is being used to fund companies that produce pernicious weapons like depleted uranium and cluster bombs.

As a result of the financial crisis there are now unprecedented calls for regulation of the banking sector.

War on Want is calling on the government to ensure that all banks are made to publish the full details of their loans, holdings and other banking services to the arms trade. The government must also introduce regulation which prevents high street banks from supporting the arms trade.

Download report

Download report:
Download a PDF version of Banking on Bloodshed.

Source

Who profits from WAR?

Published in: on December 5, 2008 at 11:51 am  Comments Off on Banking on Bloodshed: UK high street banks’ complicity in the arms trade  
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3,000 more peacekeepers needed in Congo: UN chief

November 11 2008

The head of the United Nations is requesting 3,000 more peacekeepers to help allay the conflict in Congo, calling it a “very serious and dire situation.”

Speaking at a news conference in New York Tuesday, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said the deteriorating situation in the east African nation demands more troops.

“I have requested, on an urgent basis to the Security Council, for additional resources and manpower,” he told reporters.

“I’m still concerned that even with a strong joint statement by the African leaders, we have 250,000 displaced persons.”

Thousands have been driven from their homes in eastern Congo since August, when fighting intensified between the Congolese army and rebel forces led by Laurent Nkunda.

Nkunda, a former army general, has said he is fighting to liberate all of Congo from a corrupt government, and to protect minority Tutsis from Rwandan Hutu militants who participated in the genocide before fleeing to Congo.

Although Nkunda declared a unilateral ceasefire on Oct. 29, recent clashes have undermined the fragile declaration.

Ban on Tuesday called for a new ceasefire agreement between government and rebel forces so aid workers could provide emergency assistance to “at least 100,000 refugees” cut off from basic necessities in rebel-held areas north of Goma, the provincial capital.

“This is a very serious and dire situation,” he said.

The UN Security Council was meeting Tuesday evening to consider Ban’s request to bolster the 17,000-strong UN force already on the ground in Congo.

The European Union has rejected the idea of sending its own force into the region, after France failed to win agreement from other nations Monday on a proposal to deploy a 1,500-member battle group alongside UN peacekeepers.

The announcement came amidst reports that Congolese soldiers were raping women and pillaging homes in and around the town of Kanyabayonga, about 100 kilometres north of Goma.

Soldiers involved in rampage

Between 700 and 800 soldiers were said to be involved in the rampage, which spread through several villages, UN peacekeeping spokesman Col. Jean-Paul Dietrich said Tuesday, speaking by phone from the national capital Kinshasa.

About 75,000 have already fled the Goma area because of fighting.

“There is a big tension because there are so many people there and it’s so close to Goma,” Dietrich said, adding that the UN has begun investigating the violence with the Congolese army.

Meanwhile, aid workers were trying to gain access to the towns of Rutshuru and Kiwanja, both 16 kilometres south of Kanyabayonga in rebel-held territory, where residents are believed to be without access to food.

Aid workers seeking to assist civilians trapped on rebel-held territory would be guaranteed safe passage, according to a rebel spokesman.

“If there are NGOs who want to come to Rutshuru, they are welcome to come,” said rebel spokesman Bertrand Bisimwa.

In the Kibati refugee camp just outside of Goma, a spokesperson for the International Committee of the Red Cross said the organization is scrambling to distribute necessities.

Cholera on the rise

“In the moment we are distributing foods, but from the next day we will try to start a new distribution for essential items like blankets, like tarpaulins, like soap and other things because it’s true people here are missing everything,” said Olga Miltcheva.

At least 90 cases of cholera have been recorded around Goma since Friday, according to relief officials. Seven more cases were diagnosed at a Kibati clinic Monday night.

The conflict in eastern Congo is fuelled by lingering tensions from the 1994 slaughter of a half-million Tutsis in Rwanda, and Congo’s civil wars from 1996-2002, which attracted neighbouring countries to Congo’s mineral riches.

Nkunda, who defected from Congo’s army in 2004, claims the Congolese government has not protected ethnic Tutsis from the Rwandan Hutu militia that escaped to Congo after helping slaughter a half-million Rwandan Tutsis.

He and his fighters are ready to lay down their arms, Nkunda has said, if the government agrees to disengage with “negative forces” from neighbouring countries such as Rwanda, Burundi and Uganda and hold direct talks with Nkunda under the guidance of a neutral mediator.

The administration of Congolese President Joseph Kabila has indicated it is open to discussions with all rebel and militia groups in the region, of which there are several, but will not meet solely with Nkunda’s group.

Source

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Timeline

Congo ‘worst place’ to be woman or child

Search for peace ‘doomed’ by scramble for minerals in Congo

Published in: on November 13, 2008 at 12:34 am  Comments Off on 3,000 more peacekeepers needed in Congo: UN chief  
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