Two Missing Samoyed’s believed to be Stolen from Alberta Flood area

Update on dogs.

They have been returned to the owner as of June 24 2013

Thank You to all who helped find Murphy and Stella.

Both are back home, where they belong.

Dogs found

 

Update Posted on June 23 2013

Two new stories about the flood are at the bottom of the page.

The flood has now entered two other provinces.

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Was posted on the twitter by Alana Baker

It was on the feed at CBC at the link below.

Calling the Police immediately, would also be a good call to make. If the two in question did steal the animals they should be charged with theft. Anytime you think your dog may have been stolen contact Police and report it. Even if you think your dog is just missing, it does not hurt to let Police know. They are always out and about and may see your pet.

Missing Dogs

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/story/2013/06/22/alberta-floods-evacuations.html

Some pictures of the devastation in Alberta

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/pictures-and-videos-of-flooding-in-canmore-and-calgary-alberta-1.1334613

Donations to flood Victims can also be made through the Red Cross.

http://www.redcross.ca/donate/donate-online/donate-to-the-alberta-floods

June 24 2013

Severe flooding has forced around 1,000 Siksika people from their homes on the Alberta reserve, a large portion of which hugs a stretch of the Bow River about 100 kilometres east of Calgary. The disaster has been unfolding there since Friday, when the river poured over its banks and covered some areas with over a metre of floodwater.

“How are we going to recover from all of this is what went through my thoughts,” Chief Rabbit Carrier told CBC News on Sunday.

“There’s a sense of hopelessness… as a leader you have to overcome that and put emotions aside and start working toward the recovery.”

Chief Rabbit Carrier said the community is still in a state of emergency. The reserve’s recreation centre has been turned into a shelter where a list of items — baby formula, diapers, towels, blankets and non-perishable food — are in high demand. The phone in the centre’s main office rings constantly.

“We’ve been very fortunate that we have not lost anybody,” Chief Rabbit Carrier said.

In the lobby, a group of volunteers hoping to rescue animals trapped in the flood gets organized. They’ve already saved several animals, but plenty of barn animals and pets alike have perished. “If it has a pulse, we’ll save it,” one volunteer said.

For Pictures and the entire story Go HERE

Update on flood waters

Alberta water headed to Saskatchewan

The city warned residents, along with their pets, to stay away from the South Saskatchewan River as it prepared for an influx of water not seen in more than 100 years.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/story/2013/06/23/sk-saskatoon-prepares-flooding.html

A rancher in the Estuary area, close to the South Saskatchewan River, is surrounded by water from the swollen river.

Ian Ferguson has already moved his cattle to higher ground, but water has inundated his barn and corrals.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/story/2013/06/24/sk-ranch-flooding-estuary130624.html

It is also headed to Manitoba

States of emergency have been issued for some Manitoba communities as levels of local rivers rise as a result of heavy rain and floodwaters from Alberta.

The Pas along with the Opaskwayak Cree Nation and the Rural Municipality of Kelsey were under a state of emergency on Monday because the levels of the Saskatchewan and Carrot rivers continue to increase.

Meanwhile, at least three other Manitoba municipalities have declared states of emergency as they deal with flash flooding caused by heavy rainfall over the weekend.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2013/06/24/mb-flood-emergency-winnipegosis-pipestone.html

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Published in: on June 23, 2013 at 2:33 pm  Comments Off on Two Missing Samoyed’s believed to be Stolen from Alberta Flood area  
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Update on Haiti Earthquake January 19 2010

January 19 2010

It’s believed the Haiti earthquake may claim as many as 200,000 lives – and leave 3 million homeless. This video is at one of the hospitals.

There could be as many as 2 million orphans

Haiti’s Orphan Airlift Takes 53 Kids to Pittsburgh

The tykes were taken to Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh where 53 beds were waiting for them, each with a teddy bear on it.

Rendell said that of the 53 children, 47 already have agreements for adoption and the other six children were in the process of adoption.

Haitian adoptions in limbo for Canadian families

A Regina couple says their plan to adopt two Haitian teenagers is shrouded in doubt after last week’s devastating earthquake, which damaged the youngsters’ orphanage and cut off the couple’s ability to communicate with the lawyer who was working on their case.

A List of  Options for donating to the Haiti quake relief Many have links to your country of origin. Please choose one and donate today.

They have become the most vulnerable victims of Haiti’s devastating earthquake. Before the catastrophic events almost half of the population was under 18-years-old.

Many now have been left bewildered, bruised and lonely.

In these ruins of a school the children had come to learn. It was here too they were fed their main meal of the day. Now they are hungry and abandoned.

A woman explains: “I have nothing for them my pocket, not even plain rice to help these children to live, there is nothing, nothing.” “I have nothing I am going to boil up mint tea with some salt.”

In the fog of figures emerging from Haiti it is reckoned that before the quake there were 380,000 children living in orphanages. Such scenes suggest there will be a dramatic rise in those numbers. A woman holding a child says: “Her parents are dead. I will look after her.”

Protection is critical. The UN is setting up a mission on the ground to do just that, protection against trafficking, kidnapping and sex abuse.

Julie Bergeron, UNICEF: “It would be very easy for certain people to be involved, trafficking these children, especially as they do not have birth certificates. There are many children who will go from here as their parents will always believe they are dead.”

In a field hospital in Port-au-Prince the medical team have saved the life of a five-month-old baby. He has no name, just a number. No one knows who the boys family is or if they are alive. What will happen to him when he has been treated. Such are the now daily dilemmas for the children of this quake. Source

// Haiti earthquake

One in a million: the girl in a tartan dress who symbolises the orphan crisis facing Haiti

Wyclef and Evry, two-year-old orphans at the Foyer de Sion home in Pétionville Photo Independent

9-year-old Wideline Fils Amie lost both her parents in the Haiti earthquake Photo Independent

By Guy Adams in Port-au-Prince

January 20 2010

Her name is Wideline Fils Amie. She is nine years old. Both her parents are dead, and her only possession is the red tartan dress on her back. For the past week, she’s been living and sleeping in the indescribably filthy back-yard of the Foyer de Sion orphanage in Pétionville. When you ask how she is feeling, Wideline whispers two words, through her broken teeth: “hungry” and “scared”.

Eighteen boys and girls, aged two to 15, are holed-up behind the tattered two-storey building in the hills just outside Port-au-Prince. Their food reserves consist of three bags of rice, three bags of beans, a few yams, and half a bottle of orange cordial. As of yesterday morning, they hadn’t a single drop of drinking water left. And a week after the earthquake that flattened their city, the orphanage has not received a single batch of aid.

“I don’t know why,” says Pascale Mardy, the orphanage’s manager. “We have almost nothing left. When the earthquake happened, I had $100 in my pocket to buy food. Now I have spent the last dollar, so we are down to one meal a day. We are in trouble.”

It’s the same story across Port-au-Prince, where a dysfunctional aid effort is still only slowly creaking into action. Huge reserves of supplies sit on the runway of the city’s airport. For the entire story go HERE

Israel’s compassion in Haiti can’t hide our ugly face in Gaza
By Akiva Eldar
January 18 2010

Who said we are shut up inside our Tel Aviv bubble? How many small nations surrounded by enemies set up field hospitals on the other side of the world? Give us an earthquake in Haiti, a tsunami in Thailand or a terror attack in Kenya, and the IDF Spokesman’s Office will triumph. A cargo plane can always be found to fly in military journalists to report on our fine young men from the Home Front Command.

Everyone is truly doing a wonderful job: the rescuers, searching for survivors; the physicians, saving lives; and the reporters, too, who are rightfully patting them all on the back. After Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon became the face we show the world, the entire international community can now see Israel’s good side.

But the remarkable identification with the victims of the terrible tragedy in distant Haiti only underscores the indifference to the ongoing suffering of the people of Gaza. Only a little more than an hour’s drive from the offices of Israel’s major newspapers, 1.5 million people have been besieged on a desert island for two and a half years. Who cares that 80 percent of the men, women and children living in such proximity to us have fallen under the poverty line? How many Israelis know that half of all Gazans are dependent on charity, that Operation Cast Lead created hundreds of amputees, that raw sewage flows from the streets into the sea?

The Israeli newspaper reader knows about the baby pulled from the wreckage in Port-au-Prince. Few have heard about the infants who sleep in the ruins of their families’ homes in Gaza. The Israel Defense Forces prohibition of reporters entering the Gaza Strip is an excellent excuse for burying our heads in the sand of Tel Aviv’s beaches; on a good day, the sobering reports compiled by human rights organizations such as B’Tselem, Gisha – Legal Center for Freedom of Movement, and Physicians for Human Rights-Israel on the situation in Gaza are pushed to the newspapers’ back pages. To get an idea of what life is like in the world’s largest prison, one must forgo “Big Brother” and switch to one of the foreign networks.

The disaster in Haiti is a natural one; the one in Gaza is the unproud handiwork of man. Our handiwork. The IDF does not send cargo planes stuffed with medicines and medical equipment to Gaza. The missiles that Israel Air Force combat aircraft fired there a year ago hit nearly 60,000 homes and factories, turning 3,500 of them into rubble. Since then, 10,000 people have been living without running water, 40,000 without electricity. Ninety-seven percent of Gaza’s factories are idle due to Israeli government restrictions on the import of raw materials for industry. Soon it will be one year since the international community pledged, at the emergency conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, to donate $4.5 billion for Gaza’s reconstruction. Israel’s ban on bringing in building materials is causing that money to lose its value.

A few days before Israeli physicians rushed to save the lives of injured Haitians, the authorities at the Erez checkpoint prevented 17 people from passing through in order to get to a Ramallah hospital for urgent corneal transplant surgery. Perhaps they voted for Hamas. At the same time that Israeli psychologists are treating Haiti’s orphans with devotion, Israeli inspectors are making sure no one is attempting to plant a doll, a notebook or a bar of chocolate in a container bringing essential goods into Gaza. So what if the Goldstone Commission demanded that Israel lift the blockade on the Strip and end the collective punishment of its inhabitants? Only those who hate Israel could use frontier justice against the first country to set up a field hospital in Haiti.

True, Haiti’s militias are not firing rockets at Israel. But the siege on Gaza has not stopped the Qassams from coming. The prohibition of cilantro, vinegar and ginger being brought into the Strip since June 2007 was intended to expedite the release of Gilad Shalit and facilitate the fall of the Hamas regime. As everyone knows, even though neither mission has been particularly successful, and despite international criticism, Israel continues to keep the gates of Gaza locked. Even the images of our excellent doctors in Haiti cannot blur our ugly face in the Strip. Source

Related

Update on Haiti Earthquake January 18 2010

Haiti’s dead are being buried in Mass Graves

How Haiti’s Quarter Million Slaves Will Survive The Quake

Recent

Israel floods Gaza villages, displacing a hundred families

US/Israeli Charity uses little Palestinian Childs photo to raise money for Israel’s Hungry

Spanish lawmaker’s photo used for bin Laden poster

Published in: on January 19, 2010 at 9:11 pm  Comments Off on Update on Haiti Earthquake January 19 2010  
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Campaign Money, Who Donates and How Much

The candidates for the US presidency have been raising millions of dollars every month. Find out below who’s ahead in the money race and where the cash is coming from.

FINANCIAL OVERVIEW as of 31 Aug 2008

Top graphic totals

Monthly totals

Barack Obama has raised more money than John McCain partly because of the excitement generated by the Democratic nomination battle. His donors had pressing reasons to donate, from January right through to June, while Mr McCain wrapped up the Republican nomination in March.

Mr McCain has decided to take public financing, which means that from 1 September he has a maximum of $84m [£45m] to spend on his campaign. The McCain campaign is no longer accepting donations, except to its compliance fund – money to pay for lawyers, accountants and other expenses involved in maintaining compliance with federal election laws. The Republican National Committee, however, can still raise money to support the McCain campaign.

Barack Obama is the first candidate not to take public financing since the system was introduced in the mid-1970s. He will have no spending limit.

PARTY POWER

National Committee totals

National Commitee monthly

So far, the Republican National Committee’s traditional strength at fundraising has given it a clear lead. Though the Democrats out-raised them for the first time in August, the Republicans still have four times as much in the bank.

There is a question about how effectively they will be able to use this huge cash advantage. Election rules state that, because John McCain has accepted public funding, the Republicans can only provide $19m of direct help to his campaign.

After this $19m, the money should only be used to get out their base through registering and motivating Republican voters. However, political parties are adept at finding loopholes in electoral guidelines, so they may still find ways to press their advantage.

FUNDRAISING BREAKDOWN

Obama map

McCain map

A look at where the candidates are receiving most donations reveals that Barack Obama has a distinct advantage in heavily urbanised states such as New York, Illinois and California, while John McCain is receiving significant support from the key battleground state of Florida. The McCain campaign is weaker in the liberal North-east.

Donations

One area where the Obama campaign has broken the mould of US election finance is in making big efforts to attract small donors. As a result Mr Obama has raised three times as much as John McCain from donors contributing less than $200.

MAJOR DONORS as of 31 July

Industry breakdown

Anyone making a donation above $200 must indicate their occupation. These figures can be combined with donations from unions, industry associations and political groups to give an idea of who is supporting each campaign.

John McCain is only significantly ahead on donations from retired people and from the oil and gas industries. In all almost every other area, Barack Obama is either on roughly level terms or ahead, even in those where the Republicans would expect to be strong, such as real estate, business and finance.

CAMPAIGN SPENDING as of 31 July

Campaign expenditure

The majority of a campaign’s spending is split between media – the adverts, websites and leaflets that deliver the candidate’s message – and administration, which includes offices, salaries and travel.

The biggest single expense is paid television advertising, which has been concentrated in the key battleground states.

The campaigns also reinvest a portion of their money on fundraising activities, such as live events and phoning supporters, to generate more donations.
Source

This is an interesting site Campaign Money it tells a lot. Very Interesting for sure.

Snooping about is rather enlightening. Who gives what to who and then who they give it too, etc.

This site tracks  Oil Company Donations very interesting indeed. Oil Companies certainly loved George Bush.
Follow the Oil:  Campaign Donations

George Bush 2004

Total Money Receipts $374,659,453

From Individuals $190,354,483 (Amounts over $200)

From Political Action Committees $2,545,821

From Indian Tribes $12,000

$0Self-Funded

From Oil Companies $2,652,225

A little here a little there but it adds up to a lot in the end.

It has a break down of those who donated as well.

McCain received $1,683,544 from Big oil in 2008

General Electric

Donations from 1999 to present
$6,871,199

Some have money left over I have to wonder where the left over’s go like from Giuliani

for example?

Total Money Receipts Total Money Receipts $64,442,649

Cash left over $386,298

So what happens to the left over money? Who gets it?

Published in: on October 2, 2008 at 10:47 pm  Comments Off on Campaign Money, Who Donates and How Much  
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