Wall Street/Washington Protesters an Inspiration to Behold

Who is protesting on Wall Street? Protesters speak up

NEW YORK — One is a Harvard graduate who was laid off from her publishing job. Another is a retired teacher. Both marched this week in lower Manhattan, protesting for the first time in their lives.

As the Occupy Wall Street protests expand and gain support from new sources, what began three weeks ago as a group of mostly young people camping out on the streets has morphed into something different. It’s now an umbrella movement for people of varying ages, life situations and grievances.

Karen Livecchia has what she calls two “fancy degrees,” including a master’s from New York University. The 49-year-old never thought she’d be chanting in the streets. But on Wednesday, she was collecting signatures at the march.

Nancy Pi-Sunyer also was drawn into the fray. The 66-year-old couldn’t protest during the civil rights movement or the Vietnam war. She wants her voice to be heard now.

Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/World/20111008/occupy-wall-street-protesters-111008/#ixzz1aEduvhLt

Thousands of demonstrators take to the streets of major American cities, demonstrating against the financial system, inequality, the high jobless rate in the U.S. and ‘greedy’ corporations.


Police arrest a protester on New York’s Brooklyn Bridge during the Occupy Wall Street march, on Saturday, Oct. 1, 2011.
AP Photo/Stephanie Keith

The woman above really doesn’t look like much of a threat to society now does she?

This the typical American criminal these days. If you can’t shut them up then throw them in prison. Your tax dollars hard at work. Is this how you want you tax dollars spent?  All she was doing was standing up for her rights as an American citizen and she was also standing up for your rights as well. The ones running Wall Street are the real criminals, not her.

Have you ever really though about how your tax dollars are wasted.

Arresting innocent people cost taxpayers a fortune. The cost of arresting the woman above will cost you the tax payer, about $20 to $30 thousand dollars or more. Inflation you know. All because she was standing up for your rights.

Bailouts cost the American tax payers a fortune.

War costs tax payers a fortune.

Corporations cost tax payers a fortune. Their pollution not only costs money to clean up, but it kills people. Try getting rid of a polluter in your neighborhood. The IMF and World Bank help polluting corporations into third world countries to steal resources,  pollute the environment and steal the land. Nice bunch of criminals I must say. .

Free Trade agreements cost taxpayers a fortune and jobs. They also increase poverty anywhere they have been implemented. Free Trade agreements also give Corporations more power then Governments.

Not only do the corporations make money, the US politicians make a fortune on these things. They certainly know which stock options to buy to get rich now don’t they? The American Government is one of the most corrupt bunch of criminals you will find along with Wall Street.

Seems the protesters are not the criminals here. They are the ones who want to expose who the real criminals are.

Knowing what I know about the American corruption,  my heart goes out to all the protesters.

Seems to me the protesters are the ones who took the time to get educated on the facts.

Education is suffering in the US and elsewhere.  They are not teaching children as they should. The survey says and I have heard this  thousands of times. Why did they not teach us this in school. The fact is they are not teaching you, because they do not want you to know the truth. They teach you only what they want you to know.

The stupider you are, the easier it is for them to manipulate you. If you want an education, well these days one has to educate themselves.

50 pictures of Wall  Street Protesters

Police arrest Occupy Wall Street protesters on Brooklyn Bridge

Oct 2, 2011

Video courtesy: Daryl Lang

Occupy Wall Street protesters march from Liberty Plaza to the Brooklyn Bridge on the afternoon of Saturday, October 1, 2011. The arrests seen in this video happened between around 4:30 and 5 p.m. At least 700 people have been arrested, including a New York Times reporter.

The Saga of Jack Smith & His Arrest on the Brooklyn Bridge

All About Greed: ‘Corporations + Government = Fascism’

Occupy DC Targets Wars and Economy

Oct 7, 2011

Occupy DC campaign begins with demands to end militarism and for economic justice

United Against Drones Rally/March, Occupy Washington

On Oct. 7,2011, Human Rights activists staged a rally in down town Washington, DC, in front of the office of General Atomics

Maria Allwine at Freedom Plaza, Occupy Washington

US politicians, including President Barack Obama, have been calling on Europe to fix its debt crisis, amid fears it will have a negative impact on the fragile US economy.
But there is evidence that the Greek debt crisis began on Wall Street, at the hands of one controversial US bank.
According to former financial regulators, Goldman Sachs made a dozen derivative deals with the Greeks a decade ago, writing its debt off its balance sheet for a number of years.
They also say that Goldman and Greece were not the only ones working such transactions.
Al Jazeera’s Patty Culhane investigates the morality versus legality of who is to blame for the financial crisis that is scaring the world.

Unions bolster long-running Wall Street protest

New York protests expand across U.S

OccupyWallStreet Web site

Teacher Patricia McAllister was crucified for daring to simply say outloud that Zionists controlled Wall Street while helping in an Occupy Wall Street demo in Los Angeles. She was fired for simply telling the truth. LA talkshow host Bill Handel said on his show just a few days earlier, quote, “My Tribe Controls Wall Street why should I be upset about that?” Of course, he wasn’t fired because he is part of the tribe that runs the media.
So, what are the facts? This video lays out the facts of the Zionist control of Wall Street and International finance like nothing else!
Help give this video to the world!

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Published in: on October 9, 2011 at 12:34 am  Comments Off on Wall Street/Washington Protesters an Inspiration to Behold  
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Israeli troops attack protesters injuring and killing Again!

April 29 2010

Israeli soldiers open fire along the Gaza-Israel border on Palestinian demonstrators protesting the Tel Aviv-enforced no-go zone, injuring one.

Ziad as-Sarafandi, coordinator of the Popular Committee Against the Buffer Zone in Rafah where Thursday’s demonstration took place, said Israeli troops used live ammunition at the protesters, injuring a young Palestinian from Rafah.

The protests are being conducted every day for the past week. Gaza residents are demanding access to their private and agricultural lands which are completely sealed off and declared a “combat zone” by the Israeli forces.

Individuals entering the area are “considered a threat to the citizens of Israel,” an Israeli military spokesman claimed.

On Wednesday, a similar shooting at protesters east of Gaza City injured a 19-year-old Palestinian in the leg. The young man later died in hospital.

Two days earlier four people were injured, including a female solidarity activist from Malta who was filming the protests.

As-Sarafandi demanded that Israel put an end to the enforcement of the no-go zone, which has taken away at least 20 percent of the agricultural land in Gaza.

He further said that if the Israelis want to enforce a buffer zone, they could do so on their side of the border.  Source

The  ones doing the killing and maiming are the Israelis.

Buffer zone/Combat zone what hogwash. The land as par usual does not belong to Israel. If anyone should stay off the land it is Israel.

Individuals entering the area are “considered a threat to the citizens of Israel,” an Israeli military spokesman claimed. More hogwash. Israel is the one killing people. They are the real threat.

Keeping the farmers off their land is just wrong on every level.

How are they suppose to make a living, if they can’t farm their own land?

Then again they won’t let the fishemen fish in their own waters either.

Again Israel is breaking the law.

They shoot an kill protesters a lot and call it self defense what BS.

Israel hints at one-state solution

April 30 2010

Israeli Knesset Speaker Reuven Rivlin has expressed reluctance to share occupied territories with Palestinians.

He said he doubted Tel Aviv would ever sign a peace agreement with the Palestinian Authority, adding that he did not believe acting Palestinian Authority chief Mahmoud Abbas could deliver any “good.”

Tel Aviv would rather accept Palestinians into Israel than dividing the occupied lands in a future two-state solution, Rivlin said during a Thursday meeting with Greece’s ambassador to Israel, Kyriakos Loukakis, when asked about a possible peace agreement with the Palestinians.

Meanwhile he admitted that that many Arabs have been encountering racism and arrogance from Israelis. Source

Israel does not want Peace. If there was a  one state solution who do you think would be in charge of the one state and who would do all the suffering?  Boy one can see the land grabs already, multiplying ten fold.

I can envision the horror already. The bigotry, the hate, the denial of rights. Palestinians would also be forced to join Israel Military to kill their own people or fight Israels wars against their neighbouring countries…..  Who better to put on the front lines to die then the Palestinians. What a nice tidy, so called legal way, to get even more of them killed.

They would not be treated any better then they are now. Israel could also go right ahead and steal the natural Gas off the shores of Gaza as well.  It too would be legal as well.  The Palestinians would not benefit from it however.

Oh and that is just the tip of the iceburg.

Israel goal from day one, is it to reign over all of Palestine and then move on to their neighbours and steal their land as well.

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Published in: on April 30, 2010 at 5:36 am  Comments Off on Israeli troops attack protesters injuring and killing Again!  
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Thailand: Over 800 injured and 21 deaths during protests

Thailand’s military sticks knife in as election commission rules against Abhisit

April 12, 2010 — Thailand’s Election Commission has recommended the embattled ruling party of Abhisit Vejjajiva be dissolved, potentially handing victory to anti-government protesters who have demanded the prime minister step down.

The ruling comes the same day that Thailand’s influential army chief appeared to back a key demand of the protesters, saying Parliament might need to be dissolved to resolve the country’s violent political standoff.

Anupong Paochinda, Chief of Army:

“If the issue can’t be resolved through political means, I understand that the parliament dissolution has to come, now it seems like I’m involved in politics, I think it would end in dissolution. When to dissolve is for them to discuss, as well as the time frame and constitution amendment. Now I’m too involved. I understand that it will end with parliament dissolution. Some people have suggested a government of national unity, I don’t know. I’ll leave the matter to them. I only want peace, that’s all I’m asking.”

Together, these comments and the election body’s decision could spell the end of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva’s rule. The commission found the Democrat Party guilty of misusing campaign donations.

Abhisit was seen as having the backing of the military, which has traditionally played an important role in the country’s politics. But his control of security forces has increasingly been called into question as protesters repeatedly marched through the capital.

In the recent clashes 21 people were killed. It was the worst political violence Thailand has seen in two decades.

Red-shirted protesters paraded coffins through Thailand’s capital in a renewed show of contempt for the government.

Prime Minister Abhisit blamed the bloodshed on a small group of troublemakers, whom he called “terrorists”, and continued to refuse to dissolve his government:

Abhisit Vejjajiva, Thai Prime Minister:

“Looking at the overview of what’s happening currently, we are able to see clearly that a group of people, whom we can consider as terrorists, had taken advantage of the gathering of innocent people who rallied for democracy and against injustice, and used it as a tool of create unrest in the country, hoping for a major change.”

Post-mortem examinations appeared to contradict the Government’s claim that they were not killed by soldiers.

Autopsies carried out at the Police General Hospital in Bangkok showed that nine of those examined were shot by high velocity weapons in the head, chest or stomach – confirming the impression given by video footage, which shows one unarmed protester dropping to the ground after being struck by a bullet which removed the top of his head.

A Japanese cameraman, Hiro Muramoto of Reuters, also died after being shot in the chest. Source

April 12 2010- The last footage shot by Hiro Muramoto.

Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama and Reuters colleagues pay tribute to cameraman Hiro Muramoto, killed in Bangkok’s deadly weekend riots.

Exclusive FRANCE 24 footage shows soldiers firing directly at protesters contradicts the Thai government’s declaration that soldiers only fired live rounds into the air during Saturday night clashes with “Red Shirt”

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Thailand protests claim first lives

Thai army pulls back from protest clashes; 15 dead

By GRANT PECK

April 10 2010

BANGKOK — A crackdown on anti-government protesters in Thailand’s capital Saturday left at least 15 people dead and more than 650 injured, with no progress toward ending a monthlong standoff with demonstrators demanding new elections.

It was the worst violence in Bangkok since more than four dozen people were killed in an antimilitary protest in 1992. Bullet casings, rocks and pools of blood littered the streets where pitched battles raged for hours.

Army troops later retreated and asked protesters to do the same, resulting in an unofficial truce.

Four soldiers and 11 civilians, including a Japanese cameraman, were killed, according to the government’s Erawan emergency center.

The savage fighting erupted after security forces tried to push out demonstrators who have been staging a month of disruptive protests demanding that Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajva dissolve Parliament and call new elections.

The demonstrations are part of a long-running battle between the mostly poor and rural supporters of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, and the ruling elite they say orchestrated the 2006 military coup that removed him from power on corruption allegations.

The protesters, called “Red Shirts” for their garb, see the Oxford-educated Abhisit as a symbol of an elite impervious to the plight of Thailand’s poor and claim he took office illegitimately in December 2008 after the military pressured Parliament to vote for him.

Saturday’s violence and failure to dislodge the protesters are likely to make it harder to end the political deadlock. Previously, both sides had exercised considerable restraint.

Abhisit “failed miserably,” said Michael Nelson, a German scholar of Southeast Asian studies working in Bangkok.

Tanet Charoengmuang, a political scientist at Chiang Mai University sympathetic to the Red Shirt’s cause, said he expects the fighting will resume because the protesters are unafraid and the government refused to listen to them.

Abhisit went on national television shortly before midnight to pay condolences to the families of victims and indirectly assert that he would not bow to the protesters’ demands.

“The government and I are still responsible for easing the situation and trying to bring peace and order to the country,” Abhisit said.

Nelson said he had been hopeful the situation would calm down after the troops pulled back but that Abhisit’s TV appearance raised doubts because he seemed “totally defiant.”

The army had vowed to clear the protesters out of one of their two bases in Bangkok by nightfall, but the push instead set off street fighting. There was a continuous sound of gunfire and explosions, mostly from Molotov cocktails. After more than two hours of fierce clashes, the soldiers pulled back.

Army spokesman Col. Sansern Kaewkamnerd went on television to ask the protesters to retreat as well. He also accused them of firing live rounds and throwing grenades. An APTN cameraman saw two Red Shirt security guards carrying assault rifles.

At least 678 people were injured, according to the Erawan emergency center. The deaths included Japanese cameraman Hiro Muramoto, who worked for Thomson Reuters news agency. In a statement, Reuters said he was shot in the chest.

Most of the fighting took place around Democracy Monument, but spread to the Khao San Road area, a favorite of foreign backpackers.

Soldiers made repeated charges to clear the Red Shirts, while some tourists stood by watching. Two protesters and a Buddhist monk with them were badly beaten by soldiers and taken away by ambulance.

A Japanese tourist who was wearing a red shirt was also clubbed by soldiers until bystanders rescued him.

Thai media reported that several soldiers were captured by the protesters. Red Shirts also staged protests in several other provinces, seizing the provincial hall in the northern city of Chiang Mai, Thaksin’s hometown.

On Friday, the police and army failed to prevent demonstrators from breaking into the compound of a satellite transmission station and briefly restarting a pro-Red Shirt television station that had been shut down by the government under a state of emergency. The humiliating rout raised questions about how much control Abhisit has over the police and army.

Thailand’s military has traditionally played a major role in politics, staging almost a score of coups since the country became a constitutional monarchy in 1932.

The Red Shirts have a second rally site in the heart of Bangkok’s upscale shopping district, and more troops were sent there Saturday as well. The city’s elevated mass transit system known as the Skytrain, which runs past that site, stopped running and closed all its stations.

Merchants say the demonstrations have cost them hundreds of millions of baht (tens of millions of dollars), and luxury hotels near the site have been under virtual siege.

Arrest warrants have been issued for 27 Red Shirt leaders, but none is known to have been taken into custody.

Associated Press writers Denis D. Gray, Jocelyn Gecker and Thanyarat Doksone contributed to this report. Source

Anti-government demonstrators run away from tear gas, during a clash against Thai security forces, Saturday, April 10, 2010, in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai security forces launched a large-scale crackdown Saturday on anti-government demonstrators who have been staging disruptive protests in the Thai capital for the past month, vowing to clear one of their main encampments by nightfall. Scores of people have been hurt in street clashes. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Anti-government demonstrators run away from tear gas during a clash against Thai security forces, Saturday, April 10, 2010, in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai security forces launched a large-scale crackdown Saturday on anti-government demonstrators who have been staging disruptive protests in the Thai capital for the past month, vowing to clear one of their main encampments by nightfall. Scores of people have been hurt in street clashes.(AP Photo/Wason Waintchakorn)

April 10 2010

At least four soldiers and four opposition protesters have been killed during clashes in the Thai capital Bangkok, with at least 500 others injured.

April 10 2010

The figures were given by Bangkok’s deputy governor. A bomb went off near the office of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva but no one was injured.

Red-shirted protesters hurled rocks as troops tried to clear them from the capital’s historic district. Riot police responded by firing rubber-coated bullets and tear gas. Tensions have been escalating as mass protests are entering their fifth week and supporters of ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra keep defying a state of emergency in the capital.

The protesters in Bangkok, numbering tens of thousands, are calling for the resignation of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva and fresh elections.

On Friday, a court issued a further 17 arrest warrants against opposition leaders accused of breaching emergency laws. None of them have so far been detained.  Source

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Published in: on April 10, 2010 at 10:08 pm  Comments Off on Thailand protests claim first lives  
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Kyrgyzstan: Thousands of protesters furious over corruption 40 deaths over 400 injured

By Peter Leonard

April 7 2010

BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan – Thousands of protesters furious over corruption and spiraling utility bills seized government buildings and clashed with police Wednesday in Kyrgyzstan, throwing control of the Central Asian nation into doubt. Police opened fire on demonstrators, killing dozens and wounding hundreds.

The eruption of violence shattered the relative stability of this mountainous former Soviet republic, which houses a U.S. military base that is a key supply centre in the fight against the Taliban in nearby Afghanistan. The unrest in Kyrgyzstan did not appear likely to spread across former Soviet Central Asia, however.

The chaos erupted after elite police at government headquarters in the capital, Bishkek, began shooting to drive back crowds of demonstrators called onto the streets by opposition parties for a day of protest.

The crowds took control of the state TV building and looted it, then marched toward the Interior Ministry, according to Associated Press reporters on the scene, before changing direction and attacking a national security building nearby. They were repelled by security forces.

The leader of the main opposition party said on the former state television channel that he had formed a new government and was negotiating with the president and demanding he step down. Government officials could not immediately be reached for comment on the claim.

Dozens of wounded demonstrators lined the corridors of one of Bishkek’s main hospitals, a block away from the main square, where doctors were unable to cope with the flood of patients. Weeping nurses slumped over dead bodies, doctors shouted at each other and the floors were covered in blood.

Kyrgyzstan’s Health Ministry said 40 people had died and more than 400 were wounded in clashes with police. Opposition activist Toktoim Umetalieva said at least 100 people had died after police opened fire with live ammunition.

Opposition activist Shamil Murat told the AP that Interior Minister Moldomusa Kongatiyev had been beaten to death by a mob in the western town of Talas where the unrest began a day ago. The respected Fergana.ru Web site reported later that Kongatiyev was badly beaten but had not dead, saying its own reporter had witnessed the beating.

The unrest began Tuesday in the western city of Talas, where demonstrators stormed a government office and held a governor hostage, prompting a government warning of “severe” repercussions for continuing unrest.

The opposition called nationwide protests for Wednesday, vowing to defy increasingly authoritarian President Kurmanbek Bakiyev.

Since coming to power in 2005 on a wave of street protests known as the Tulip Revolution, Bakiyev has ensured a measure of stability, but many observers say he has done so at the expense of democratic standards while enriching himself and his family.

Over the past two years, Kyrgyz authorities have clamped down on free media, and opposition activists say they have routinely been subjected to physical intimidation and targeted by politically motivated criminal investigations. Many of the opposition leaders once were allies of Bakiyev.

Anti-government forces have been in disarray until recently, but widespread anger over a 200 per cent hike in electricity and heating gas bills has galvanized the fractious opposition.

Police in Bishkek at first used rubber bullets, tear gas, water cannons and concussion grenades Wednesday to try to control crowds of young men clad in black who were chasing police officers, beating them up and seizing their arms, trucks and armoured personnel carriers.

Some protesters then tried to use a personnel carrier to ram the gates of the government headquarters, known as the White House. Many of the protesters threw rocks, but about a half dozen young protesters shot Kalashnikovs into the air from the square in front of the building.

“We don’t want this rotten power!” protester Makhsat Talbadyev said, as he and others in Bishkek waved opposition party flags and chanted: “Bakiyev out!”

Some 200 elite police began firing, pushing the crowd back from the government headquarters. The president was not seen in public Wednesday and his whereabouts were unclear.

Protesters set fire to the prosecutor general’s office in the city centre, and a giant plume of black smoke billowed into the sky.

Groups of protesters then set out across Bishkek, attacking more government buildings.

At least 10 opposition leaders were arrested overnight and were being held at the security headquarters in Bishkek, opposition lawmaker Irina Karamushkina said.

One of them, Temir Sariyev, was freed Wednesday by protesters.

The U.S. State Department called for peace and restraint on both sides.

The prime minister, meanwhile, accused the opposition of provoking the violence in the country of 5 million people.

“What kind of opposition is this? They are just bandits,” Prime Minister Daniyar Usenov said.

Unrest also broke out for a second day in the western town of Talas and spread to the southern city of Naryn.

Some 5,000 protesters seized Naryn’s regional administration building and installed a new governor, opposition activist Adilet Eshenov said. At least four people were wounded in clashes, including the regional police chief, he said.

Another 10,000 protesters stormed police headquarters Wednesday in Talas, where on Tuesday protesters had held the regional governor hostage in his office.

The protesters beat up the interior minister, Kongatiyev, and forced him to call his subordinates in Bishkek and call off the crackdown on protesters, a correspondent for the local affiliate of U.S.-funded Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty said.

Witnesses said the crowd in Talas looted police headquarters Wednesday, removing computers and furniture. Dozens of police officers left the building and mingled with protesters.

In the eastern region of Issyk-Kul, protesters seized the regional administration building and declared they installed their governor, the Ata-Meken opposition party said on its Web site.

Hundreds of protesters overran the government building Tuesday on Talas’ main square. They were initially dispersed by baton-wielding police, but then fought through tear gas and flash grenades to regroup, burning police cars and hurling stones and Molotov cocktails.

Usenov said Tuesday’s violence in Talas had left 85 officers injured and 15 unaccounted for.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who met with Bakiyev in Kyrgyzstan on Sunday, arrived in Moscow on Wednesday at the end of a trip to several Central Asian nations.

“The secretary-general is shocked by the reported deaths and injuries that have occurred today in Kyrgyzstan,” U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky said. “He once again calls on all concerned to show restraint. He urgently appeals for dialogue and calm to avoid further bloodshed.”

The leaders of the four other former Soviet republics in the region were certain to be watching events in Bishkek with concern, but the authoritarian, and in some cases dictatorial, natures of their governments would likely allow them to squash any attempts to challenge their rules.

In Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, people have been too terrified to challenge Stalinist-style governments. In Tajikistan, the legacy of a 1990s civil war has made people wary of conflict. Immediate unrest also appeared unlikely in energy-rich Kazakhstan, where politically apathy is combined with a weak opposition.

After the March 2005 protests that brought Bakiyev to power, some hoped that the democracy he then promised to bring to Kyrgyzstan would spread to the other former Soviet republics in the region. But those countries responded by clamping down further, equating democracy with regime change.

Just two months later, in May 2005, the Uzbek government brutally suppressed an uprising in the city of Andijan.

Writer Leila Saralayeva contributed to this report.

Source

This is what happens when you piss people off. You cannot steal from people and oppress them and expect them to sit ideally by and do nothing. Sooner or latter they will turn on you.

A state of emergency has been declared in Kyrgyzstan as thousands of protesters calling for President Bakiev to resign, clash with police across the country. Unconfirmed reports suggest at least 17 people have been killed and hundreds injured. Witnesses say Kyrgyz interior minister has died from injuries in Kyrgyz city of Talas.

A state of emergency has been declared in Kyrgyzstan as thousands of protesters calling for President Bakiev to resign, clash with police across the country. Unconfirmed reports suggest at least 17 people have been killed and over 140 are injured.

Kyrgyzstan’s President Kurmanbek Bakiyev has reportedly left the country after thousands of protesters, calling for him to step down, clashed with police. The opposition claims one hundred people have been killed, but the country’s Health Ministry, says the number of dead is 40.

Where there is US involvement there are always problems.  Leaders the US stand behind are unusably corrupt and oppress the people.  History tells us that. Most countries do not want US Military bases on their soil.

When there are problems in a country, more times then not, the cookie crumbs lead back to the US. The US just wants Kyrgyzstan so they can use it to wage war. Which is just what they have been doing. That is what all their Military bases are for to wage war on other countries. The US could care less about the people living in Kyrgyzstan however. With their Military bases comes war, pollution and crime.

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Kyrgyz elders want US base shut, troops gone
March 14 2010

The Council of Elders in Kyrgyzstan has demanded that the country’s authorities shut down a US base at Manas International Airport outside the capital, Bishkek. Besides the closure demand, the council is also calling for an immediate withdrawal of the US Troops from their country. “Until the entire contingent leaves [Kyrgyzstan], all flights of combat airplanes must be banned, but civilian airplanes can be authorized to deliver humanitarian and other peaceful supplies,” they said.

The military presence of the U.S. and other NATO member states in the territory of Kyrgyzstan poses a threat to our national interests,” the council said in a statement read at a news conference on Wednesday.  Source

Kyrgyz rally against US air base

Bishkek (AFP) Oct 22, 2008

Some 100 activists from two Kyrgyz political groups rallied Tuesday in capital Bishkek, calling for withdrawal of the US air base from Kyrgyzstan.Protesters from the nationalist Zhoomart group and the Sergiy Radonezhsky Fund cheered as Zhoomart’s leader Nurlan Motuyev publicly burned a US flag and an effigy of US President George W. Bush.

“Americans are the first to begin wars everywhere, they kill peaceful Muslims, spill fuel on our soil and make farmers suffer from poor crops. Away with the air base!” Motuyev called.

“There is a threat that if a US base stays in Kyrgyzstan, Muslim countries like Iraq, Afghanistan and China would take vengeance on us,” the Fund’s leader Igor Trofimov warned.

Police, though present, did not interfere.

Local protests against US military presence are often staged both in Bishkek and next to the air base.

The air base, which shares premises with the country’s main airport at Manas, outside the capital, is crucial to Washington’s operations in Afghanistan.

About 1,000 US troops are stationed at Manas. Source

PROTESTS AGAINST U.S. MILITARY PRESENCE HELD IN BISHKEK

October 22, 2008

The U.S. image in Kyrgyzstan was considerably tarnished following the shooting of a Kyrgyz truck driver Aleksander Ivanov in December 2006 by U.S. serviceman Zackary Hatfield. Since then a group of activists, including Ivanov’s widow Marina Ivanova, several journalists, and NGO leaders have been active campaigning for the withdrawal of the U.S. base. Source

Kyrgyzstan unveils US military training base plan

March 7 2010

BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan (AP) – Officials in the impoverished Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan say the United States plans to build a $5 million military base for training local troops to assist in the fight against international terrorism.

Kyrgyzstan already hosts a U.S. military base in Manas, outside the capital Bishkek, used by Washington as a regional hub for the U.S.-led war in nearby Afghanistan.

A Kyrgyz Defense Ministry statement released Wednesday says the training base – complete with barracks, dining hall, classrooms and an assault course – will be constructed near the southern town of Batken.

No timeframe was mentioned.

The Kyrgyz government last year backed off a threat to evict U.S. forces from Manas after Washington offered to increase the rent it pays threefold. Source

Japan Tokunoshima islanders reject US Marines base

Raising the price of heat and hydro over 200 percent is just stupid. I wonder if the President had share in the companies?

Privatization leads to higher prices.

Then there are those who wish to exploit the countries resources.

Kyrgyzstan – prospective one day, poison the next

By Robin Bromby
April 08, 2010
SHAREHOLDERS in a clutch of junior explorers will today be watching events in the central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan with great interest – or, possibly, with trepidation. There has been severe political unrest in the capital, Bishkek, overnight with conflicting reports as to whether the government is still controlling the country. Certainly many people have been killed, possibly 100 or more.

Australian explorers have been keen on this country for some time – it is known to contain uranium (it being the first source of yellowcake when the Soviet Union went nuclear after World War II) and has great promise with gold, base metals, geothermal and hydrocarbon. And, it must be added, the uprising may be shortlived, a new government may well ensure that resources companies are unaffected and most of the projects are located well away from the capital and strife.

But this surge of political risk couldn’t have come at a worse time for Kentor Gold which is on the brink of giving the green light to its Andash copper gold development.

Others affected include Caspian Oil & Gas which has a large acreage position around the Fergana Basin, an area which has been supporting oil production the early 1900s. In late February CIG announced that its joint venture partner in Kyrgyzstan,Santos, had decided to withdraw after spending $US16 million on the project. Caspian is now looking for a new JV partner.

And it was just last week that Manas Resources announced some very encouraging gold drilling results from its Shambesai project in the central Asian republic.

But there are a couple of juniors that will be thinking they dodged a bullet.

Panax Geothermal has effectively wound back work in the country while it awaits news on its application for World Bank financing, Ram Resources last year handed over its Kyrgyzstan interests in lieu of debt to its former Canadian partner, while Namibian Copper last year kicked the tyres on two uranium projects before deciding that Africa was a better bet.

brombyr@theaustralian.com.au

The writer implies no investment recommendation and this report contains material that is speculative in nature. Investors should seek professional investment advice. The writer does not shares in any company mentioned.

April 8 2010 Updates

Why large-scale riots in Kyrgyzstan?

Also

PM and cabinet of Kyrgyzstan resign and flee the country

Kyrgyzstan’s Prime Minister Daniyar Usenov with his entire cabinet resigned last night and fled to neighbouring Kazakhstan. Anti-government protesters have seized the Parliament and clashed with security forces in which at least 40 people were killed and over 400 injured.

Interfax news agency reported from capital Bishkek that Usenov signed his cabinet’s resignation and handed over the powers to the leader opposition in Parliament Roza Otunbayeva.

Later in a statement Otunbayeva declared that the power in this of Central Asian republic has been assumed by the government of popular trust. Source

The death toll is between 68 and 100.  The number was about 40 deaths earlier.

Update April 9 2010

I am still the president, cries ousted Kyrgyz leader

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Published in: on April 7, 2010 at 8:48 pm  Comments Off on Kyrgyzstan: Thousands of protesters furious over corruption 40 deaths over 400 injured  
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Egypt : 42 electoral candidates and 145 protestors arrested in one day

March 12 2010

42 Muslim Brotherhood leaders were arrested from their homes earlier this morning. After Friday prayers today, 53 protestors were arrested outside Abu Magda Mosque in Al-Ismaliya and 70 more in Maidan Al-Sharqiya, of which eight are women, following demonstrations against the blockading Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem by Israeli forces earlier today.
The violent crackdown on protestors seems to be a reprisal by the Egyptian Government following the recent announcement by numerous Muslim Brotherhood leaders of their candidatures for the upcoming legislative election.
In the early hours of 12 March 2010, 42 leading members of the Muslim Brotherhood were arrested from their home in a wave of arrests that swept across four Egyptian governorates: Al-Bahira, Al-Sharqiya, Al-Munufeya and Al-Daqhliya. These individuals were arrested after many of them announced earlier this week that they would be running in Egypt’s parliamentary elections, due in November 2010. For example, Mohamed Al-Faki, Abd Al-Nasser Abu Al-Dahab and Akasha Abad (محمد الفقي وعبد الناصر أبو الدهب وعكاشة عباد) all made seperate announcements that they would be running in the elections in November. They are now detained in the State Security buildings, solely due to their desire to take part in the politics of their country. The names of the 42 individuals arrested are listed below.
These mass arrests come less than a month after Alkarama submitted the cases of 80 leaders and members of the Muslim Brotherhood arrested from Cairo, Giza, Al-Sharqiya, Al-Daqhliya and Al-Gharbiya to the Special Rapporteur on the Freedom of Expression on 12 February 2010. Among these were three key figures of the Muslim Brotherhood: Dr Mahmoud Ezzat, Dr Esam Al-Aryan and Dr Abdulrahman Al-Barr.
145 Protestors Arrested
Earlier today Israeli security forces prevented hundreds of worshippers from performing Friday prayers at Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. Since the early hours of Friday morning, Israeli occupying forces deployed large numbers of police units and border guards around the city.
This move not only sent Jerusalem into chaos but sparked reactions throughout the region, and in particular in Egypt. The Muslim Brotherhood called for nationwide protests, which the Egyptian security services reacted to especially harshly – likely in an attempt to disrupt support for the Muslim brotherhood, following the abovementioned public statements.
The Egyptian State Security Intelligence services, with the aid of General Investigative services and Central Security agents mobilized efforts in a massive campaign of arrests. Maidan Al-Sharqiya was the worst hit region, suffering more than 70 arrests of which eight are women. Demonstrations also took place at Abu Magda Mosque in Al-Ismaliya where some 53 demonstrators were detained, and in Alexandria where 22 people were arrested by security forces.
Alkarama deplores the continued repression of opposition movements within Egypt. These mass arrests follow the arrest and torture earlier this week of Doctor Taha Abdel Tawab Mohammed, a supporteur of Mohamed Al Baradei,the former head of the IAEA and recipient of the nobel peace prize, who seems to be aiming to run in the presidential elections. Alkarama is collecting information regarding these individuals and will be informing the appropriate UN human rights mechanisms of these new arrests.

42 candidates in Parliamentary elections arrested

Arrested in Al-Bahira: Professor Mr Nazili, official administrative office of the Muslim Brotherhood in Giza, Mohamed Al-Fiqi, Abdul Nasser Abu Al-Dahab, and Akasha Abaada (former candidates of the Muslim Brotherhood in the parliamentary elections), and Abdel Fattah Hanafi, and Dr Ahmad Murad, and Rafat Saad, Dr Hossam Shandi, and Mohammed Abu Al-Qasim, Muhammad Hussain, Khalid Fadl, Ali Jaber, Abdel Karim Abdulmaksoud, and Abdulfattah Fathi, Alaa Mohammad Ali.

Arrested in Al-Sharqiya: Dr Abdul Hamid, a former member of the parliament, Dr Amir Bassam (Professor and Chairman, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University), Ahmed Mahmoud Mohamed Yamani, Agricultural Engineer Management in Baleis, Dr Ismail Ali (Professor and Head of Advocacy and Islamic Culture at the Faculty of Theology, Al-Azhar University Mansoura Branch – from Kafr Saqr), Dr Abdul Abdullah Majeed (Professor of Urology at the University of Zagazig), Dr Said Mansour (pediatrician at Fakous Hospital), and Abdulnasser Abdulhamid (Secondary school maths teacher in Fakous), and Sheikh Shabal (Imam and preacher in Mina Al-Qamh), and Mohammed Abdrab Al-Rasul (a teacher Mina Al-Qamh).

Arrested in Al-Munufeya: Dr Abdullah Al-Nahas and Osama Younis, Tareq Al-Sharif (from Shabein Al-Kom), Dr Jamal Khalifa (from Al-Shahida), Dr Ahmed Shaheen, Khaled Al-Sawi (from Barka Al-Sabaa), and Dasooqi Abu Issa (from Menouf), and Mohamed Gabr (from Quesna), and Sami Al-Usta (from Tila).

Arrested in Daqahliya: Ibrahim Saleh, Dr Mohammed Haikal (pharmacist), Dr Awad Mohamed (pharmacist), and Saber Abu Zeid (teacher), Dr Mohammed Al-Zamity (Hospital Insurance Director in Mit Ghamer), Ramadan Al-Khatib (agricultural engineer), Abdel Fattah Abu Hassan, and Adel Abdulrahman (secondary school teacher), and Salah Saad.

The names of 53 of the detained protestors :

1. Mohammed Shteiwi
2. Faraj Sabri
3. Ahmed Ahmed Abdullah
4. Mohammed Salim
5. Mahmoud Gad Al-Rab
6. Rashid Awada Haikal
7. Farih Awada
8. Suleiman Mansour
9. Ahmed Younis
10. Suleiman Ibrahim Abdel Rab Nabi
11. Yasir Haggag
12. Zahran Al-Said
13. Mohamed Abdulrahman
14. Suleiman Haggag
15. Mohammed Ibrahim
16. Abdelkader Ayed
17. Motawla Ali Salah
18. Adnan Labib
19. Ashraf Jibali
20. Abdul Rahman Rafat
21. Osama Rafat
22. Ahmad Rafat
23. Abdullah Ali Gharib
24. Ibrahim Rushdie
25. Hossam Hassan
26. Ahmad Awwad
27. Hisham Ali Salem
28. Hudhifa Awad Al-Dawa
29. Mahmoud Abou Al-Anein
30. Mohamed Taha
31. Ismail Gareesh
32. Mohamed Ahmed Abbas
33. Ahmed Abdel Muata Ashmawi
34. Tamer Fozy
35. Reda Ayad
36. Khaled Talaat Khaled
37. Mahmoud Salem
38. Jamal Hamid
39. Mohammed Saber Mohammed Mahdi
40. Abdulrahman Abdel Salam Hazein
41. Abdullah Ahmad Al-Fiqi
42. Hossam Hassan Saada
43. Rida Said
44. Sweilem Mohammed Swailem
45. Mohamed Madbouli
46. Ibrahim Madbouli
47. Ahmed Madbouli
48. Ahmed Mohamed Ismail
49. Yasser Mohamed Ammam
50. Hassan Al-Mansi
51. Wael Hassan Mohamed Issa
52. Rufai Al-Aaidi
53. Tamer Hassoona

Source

Cairo, 12 March – Egyptian police forces arrested some fifty Muslim Brotherhood members in several districts of Cairo during demonstrations held after Friday prayers in support of the Al Aqsa mosque in Occupied Jerusalem. The arrested include a number of people proposed as candidates for the upcoming parliamentary elections in May.

The organization had called for demonstrations in defence of Muslim holy shrines and sites in Palestine endangered by the Israeli project to convert them into alleged Jewish heritage sites. The endangered Muslim holy sites include the Ibrahimi Mosque in Hebron and the Bilal Mosque in Bethlehem.

Source

The Brotherhood controls a fifth of seats in parliament after it fielded candidates as independents in a 2005 election.

Well now this is interesting indeed.  The Egyptian Government not looking so good yet again.  Arresting 42 candidates really makes one wonder?

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Published in: on March 14, 2010 at 2:43 am  Comments Off on Egypt : 42 electoral candidates and 145 protestors arrested in one day  
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700 Israelis arrested for protesting against war

‘Israel is acting like a state terrorist’

January 13 2009
In eight years: twenty Israelis died from Gaza rockets, 4,000 Israelis died from car accidents.
PACIFICA

About 700 Israelis have been arrested for protesting against the war on Gaza since the beginning of the deadly offensive, said Neve Gordon, chair of the Department of Politics and Government at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel on Monday.

“700 Israelis have been arrested since this war began, because they protested this war. This has not made it to an international media, and it’s an act of intimidation by the state against those who protest the war,” Gordon told Amy Goodman of Democracy Now!.

On the number of Israeli deaths, Gordon said: “between ten and twenty people, Israelis, have died from rockets in the eight years that rockets have been launched from the Gaza Strip into Israel. During the same amount of time, 4,000 Israelis have died from car accidents.”
But Israel still used that as an excuse to bomb Gaza.

“From these twenty people, we’re allowed to enter into the Gaza Strip and bomb them from the air into their cage and kill 275 children,” said Gordon, who is also the author of the book Israel’s Occupation.

Gordon criticized Israel’s continuous violations of international law.

“Disproportionality is a term from international law. Israel has been defying international law and international agreements and international decisions from 1967, or probably from before.

One of these decisions is that Israel must return these (Palestinian) territories. And by maintaining and holding onto these territories through violent means,” said Gordon.

Although Gordon opposes Gaza rocket fire, he explained that the Palestinians are trying to defend themselves.

“The right to self-defense is a right to self-defense from violence. We have to understand that the occupation itself is violence. It’s an act of violence.

Putting people in a prison, in a prison of one million and a half million people and keeping them there for years on end without basic foodstuff, without allowing them to enter and exit when they will, is an act of violence.

Without electricity, without clean water, it’s all an act of violence. And these people are resisting. I am against the way they’re resisting, but we have to look at their violence versus our violence,” said Gordon.

“Gaza is still under occupation, because Israel controls all of its borders, and the West Bank is under occupation, and East Jerusalem is under occupation. And the act—the first, the initial, the primordial act of violence is the occupation.

The rockets are a reaction to that act of violence. And so, we have to keep in mind that within—it’s not between a state and another state. It’s been between an occupier and an occupied,” he noted.

On the media war, Gordon noted: “Israel is dealing with a propaganda war. Israel is the one that disseminated a video of Hamas shooting rockets from a school, a video that’s almost two years old, claiming that the video was taken a day or two earlier. So Israel is in a propaganda war.”

Gordon noted that “although Hamas did launch an incredible amount of rockets at the end of the ceasefire,” it was Israel which broke the ceasefire on November 4th “when it attacked in the Gaza Strip.”

“Israel actually is a first actor that broke the ceasefire,” noted Gordon.

Gordon also accused Israel of committing acts of terrorism.

“Yes, the Hamas is fighting out from a civilian population, but Israel has the choice whether it’s going to bomb the civilian population or not, and it is intentionally deciding to bomb the civilian population.

So in terms of intentionality in bombing areas where there are civilians, Israel is acting like a state terrorist.

So, if your definition of terrorism doesn’t take into account the identity of the actor—and state actors can also be terrorists—then when you bomb a school and when you bomb a university and when you bomb a neighborhood and you’re killing much more civilians than militants, then you’re doing something that is an act of terror,” he explained.

Gordon cited two reasons behind Israel’s offensive against Gaza.

“I think the actual reasons have to do—the two major reasons—with rebuilding the reputation of the Israeli military after its humiliation in 2006 in Lebanon and the upcoming Israeli elections.”

But the Israeli author believes that there is a way to solve the conflict.

“Hamas is the elected government of the Palestinian people. We don’t need to like them. I don’t like them. But they are the elected government, and we need to sit down and talk with them and not bomb them,” he noted.

“We have to come out and say we are willing to talk with our enemies, even with people that say that they do not believe in the existence of Israel.

The PLO said that they do not believe in the existence of Israel for many years. And ultimately, we sat down and talked with them, and they are now considered our Palestinian partner. I believe that if there is a pragmatic side, a strong pragmatic wing in Hamas, that if we start negotiation with them, over the years these people will also agree to the existence of Israel and be willing to live side by side with us,” he added.

“If we do not talk with them, if we continue this cycle of violence, ultimately Israel will be destroyed, because ultimately, the technological edge that we have over our neighbors will not be meaningful. So we have to change our approach.

We have to be pro—by changing our approach, we’re actually pro-Israeli. We say we want to see Israel a hundred years from now. And the only way we’ll see Israel exist a hundred years from now is if Israel makes peace with Syria, with Lebanon and with the Palestinian people,” Gordon explained.

Source

The should really get the roads cleaned up in Israel, they are more dangerous then Hamas.

Israel Bars Arab Parties From Election

Left Claims Ban is ‘Patriotic’

By Jonathan Cook in Nazareth

January 16, 2009

The only three Arab parties represented in the Israeli parliament vowed yesterday to fight a decision by the Central Elections Committee to bar them from running in next month’s general election.

In an unprecedented move signalling a further breakdown in Jewish-Arab relations inside Israel, all the main Jewish parties voted on Monday for the blanket disqualification. Several committee members equated the Arab parties’ vocal support for the Gazan people with support for terrorism.

The decision follows the arrest of at least 600 Arab demonstrators since the outbreak of the Gaza offensive and the interrogation by the secret police of dozens of Arab community leaders. The three parties — the National Democratic Assembly, the United Arab List and the Renewal Movement — have seven legislators out of a total of 120 in the Israeli parliament, the Knesset.

The elections committee barred all three from putting up candidates for the Feb 10 election on the grounds that they had violated a 2002 law by refusing to recognise Israel as a Jewish state and by supporting a terrorist organisation.

Ahmed Tibi, the leader of Renewal, denounced the decision as “a political trial led by a group of fascists and racists who are willing to see the Knesset without Arabs and want to see the country without Arabs”.

A petition against the disqualification will be heard by a panel of Supreme Court justices this week.

Hassan Jabareen, the director of the Adalah legal rights group, which represents the Arab parties, noted that the disqualification motion had been introduced by far right-wing parties.

Such parties include Yisrael Beiteinu, which campaigns for the country’s 1.2 million-strong Arab minority to be stripped of citizenship.

“It is absurd that the committee is backing a motion from racist parties in the Knesset to exclude the Arab parties whose platform is that Israel must be made into a proper democracy treating all its citizens equally.”

The elections committee is composed of representatives from all the major parties. Although it has voted for disqualification of Arab candidates before, it is the first time both that the left-wing Labor Party has backed such a motion and that all the Arab parties have been included in the ban.

Mr Jabareen accused the right-wing parties of exploiting the war atmosphere. Labor’s secretary general, Eitan Cabel, called his party’s conduct in voting for the disqualification “patriotic”.

All the Arab parties have harshly criticised the attack on Gaza. This week Mr Tibi described Israeli actions as “genocide”, while Ibrahim Sarsour, of the United Arab List, said Israel was seeking to “eliminate the Palestinian cause”.

In the past, Arab Knesset members have also upset their Jewish colleagues by travelling to neighbouring Arab states, defying a change in the law to prevent such visits.

Following the vote on the ban, Avigdor Lieberman, leader of Yisrael Beiteinu, suggested his party had additional goals: “The next battle is making [the National Democratic Assembly] illegal because it is a terrorist organisation whose objective is harming the state of Israel.”

Mr Lieberman and other legislators have been hounding the NDA for years, chiefly because it is led by Azmi Bishara, an outspoken proponent of equal rights for Arab citizens. Israeli secret police forced Mr Bishara into exile two years ago, accusing him of treason after the 2006 Lebanon war.

During the 2003 election, when the committee barred the NDA and Mr Tibi from running, the decision was overturned by a majority of the Supreme Court. But few of the justices from that hearing are still on the bench.

“There are reasons to be fearful,” Mr Jabareen said. “The Supreme Court is also susceptible to the current war atmosphere and its authority has been greatly eroded over the past year. It has been forced on to the defensive over claims from the Right that its decisions support the Left.”

If the ban is upheld, some Arab representation in the Knesset is likely to continue. The joint Arab and Jewish Communist Party is allowed to stand, and the three major Jewish parties include one or two Arab candidates on their lists, though not always in electable positions.

Meanwhile, Israeli police admitted they arrested about 600 people involved in protests against the Gaza offensive, some of them for stone-throwing. Adalah lawyers said more than 200 people, most of them Arab, were still in jail.

“We’re talking about mass arrests,” said Abeer Baker, adding that Israel was exploiting a 30-day window before an indictment had to be filed to hold suspects without producing evidence.

In addition, the Shin Bet, Israel’s secretive domestic security service, has called in dozens of Arab leaders for interrogation. Ameer Makhoul, head of the Ittijah organisation, which promotes Arab causes in Israel, was detained last week. He said a security official who interrogated him threatened to jail him over demonstrations he helped to organise in support of Gaza.

“The officer called me a rebel threatening the security of the state during time of war and said he would be happy to transfer me to Gaza,” Mr Makhoul said.

Haaretz, a leftist Israeli daily newspaper, has called the interrogations “intimidation tactics to prevent legitimate protest”.

Source

They also arrest you and put you in jail,  if you refuse to fight in their army.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

UN Document Series Symbol: ST/HR/

UN Issuing Body: Secretariat Centre for Human Rights

United Nations

Adopted and proclaimed by General Assembly resolution 217 A(III) of 10 Dec.1948.

PREAMBLE

Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,

Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,

Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law,

Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations,

Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in cooperation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms,

Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge,

Now, therefore,

The General Assembly,

Proclaims this Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

Article 1

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2

Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

Article 3

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

Article 4

No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

Article 5

No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Article 6

Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Article 7

All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

Article 8

Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

Article 9

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Article 10

Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

Article 11

1. Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.

2. No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.

Article 12

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

Article 13

1. Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each State.

2. Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.

Article 14

1. Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.

2. This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 15

1. Everyone has the right to a nationality.

2. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

Article 16

1. Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.

2. Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.

3. The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

Article 17

1. Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.

2. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

Article 18

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

Article 19

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

Article 20

1. Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.

2. No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

Article 21

1. Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.

2. Everyone has the right to equal access to public service in his country.

3. The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

Article 22

Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

Article 23

1. Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.

2. Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.

3. Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.

4. Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

Article 24

Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

Article 25

1. Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.

2. Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.

Article 26

1. Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.

2. Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.

3. Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

Article 27

1. Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.

2. Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

Article 28

Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

Article 29

1. Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.

2. In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.

3. These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 30

Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.

Israel Navy ships turn back “Spirit of Humanity” carrying Gaza humanitarian aid

A group barricades itself in Turkish ruling party office to protest Gaza

President of the United Nations General Assembly: Israel violating International Law

79 % of the time: Israel caused conflicts not Hamas

Gaza War Why?: Natural Gas valued at over $4 billion MAYBE?

Indexed List of all Stories in Archives

Published in: on January 17, 2009 at 3:10 am  Comments Off on 700 Israelis arrested for protesting against war  
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A group barricades itself in Turkish ruling party office to protest Gaza

A group barricades itself in Turkish ruling party office to protest Gaza

A group from a Turkish organization Friday barricaded themselves inside the offices of the ruling AKP in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa and demanded that the prime minister break ties with Israel.

Nearly 30 people, including women and children, from the Organization of Human Rights and Solidarity for Oppressed People (Mazlum-Der) locked themselves inside the building, Dogan News Agency reported.

The demonstrators chanted anti-Israel slogans and hung posters and banners inside and outside the offices. “We will remain here until relations with Israel are cut,” and “(Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip) Erdogan is crying. (Venezuela’s President Hugo) Chavez is sacking (Israeli ambassador),” some posters read.

“Damn collaborator leaders,” the protesters shouted from the windows of the offices.

Venezuela on Wednesday broke diplomatic ties with Jewish state over its military offensive in the Gaza Strip and refusal to comply with international calls for a ceasefire, a week after it expelled the Israeli ambassador in Caracas.

Turkey, Israel’s main regional ally, is one of the countries that have condemned the Jewish state for its offensive on Gaza.

Erdogan, who has repeatedly criticized Israel, said Friday the Jewish state should be barred from the United Nations while it ignores the body’s calls to end the fighting in Gaza. However he has stopped short of deciding to suspend ties with Israel.

Source

Along with Venezuela and Bolivia

Syria: ‘Cut all ties with Israel’

Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president, has urged all Arab nations to sever diplomatic ties with Israel because of the Gaza war.

Qatar, Mauritania cut Israeli ties

Qatar and Mauritania have severed economic and political ties with Israel in protest against the war in Gaza, Al Jazeera has learned.

The move announced on Friday followed calls by Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president, and Khaled Meshaal, the exiled leader of Hamas, for all Arab nations to cut ties with Israel.

Addressing leaders at an emergency Arab summit in Doha, the Qatari capital, al-Assad declared that the Arab initiative for peace with Israel was now “dead”.

The Palestinian Statistics Bureau also reported on Friday that the war has cost the Palestinian economy at least $1.4bn.

The bureau said 26,000 Gazans were unable to live in their homes and were being housed in temporary shelter.

Much of Gaza’s infrastructure lies in ruins. The statistics show that 20,000 residential buildings are damaged and 4,000 more destroyed.

Hamas has proposed a year-long, renewable ceasefire if Israel immediately ends its offensive in Gaza and lifts its crippling blockade of the territory.

Conditions of Ceasefire. On both sides.

Israel: wants

– International force to stop weapons smuggling into Gaza

Palestine: wants

– Immediate halt to offensive

– Full withdrawal of Israeli troops from Gaza

– Re-open all crossing points into Gaza

– Lift Gazan economic siege, (this has long been sought, by them and with good reason).

How can Israel, which totally ignores and does not implement resolutions of the UN Security Council, be allowed to enter through the doors of the UN?

“Why is it the US can get away with Vetoing over 40 resolutions by the UN to end the problem’s between Israel and Gaza?

Why can’t the US see their allies are a problem. Unless of course the US wants them to be a problem.

Then again the US did not Comply with the UN resolution that was against the war in Iraq either.

Why is it the west interferes with elections? What gives them the right?

I think the US should stop arming Israel with  “Weapons of Mass Destruction” and it should cut all Aid for these weapons as well.

As of January 15 2009

1,133 Palestinians have been killed and more than 5,200 wounded, according to Gaza medics.

At least 346 children are among the dead.

Israel says 10 Israeli soldiers ( some were killed by friendly fire, lest we forget) and 3 civilians have been killed in the same period, and an Israeli government spokesman indicated that the end of the three-week-old offensive may close.

Why do I have a sneaking suspicion, right after the weapons are delivered to Israel by the US this will all start again?

US delivering more “Weapons of Mass Destruction” to Israel

79 % of the time: Israel caused conflicts not Hamas

Indexed List of all Stories in Archives

Published in: on January 16, 2009 at 9:11 pm  Comments Off on A group barricades itself in Turkish ruling party office to protest Gaza  
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White House Protesters Throw Shoes at Bush Effigy

White House Protesters Throw Shoes at Bush Effigy
December 17 2008

Anti-war protesters throw shoes at a fellow demonstrator wearing a prison uniform and mask of President George W. Bush outside the White House in Washington, on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2008. (AP Photo)

By  Tom Fitzgerald

President Bush may have though he’d see the last of shoes being thrown his way, but the anti-war group Code Pink showed up at the White House Wednesday to stage a protest inspired by the President’s much-discussed shoe ducking incident.

The protesters took turns throwing shoes at a large puppet that was made up to look like President Bush. A shoe memorial was also laid out on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House to represent the Iraqi civilians who have been killed during the war.

The group’s founder, Meda Benjamin, says she views the Iraqi reporter who threw his footwear at the president as a role model, saying “We feel that the Iraq reporter is now a hero throughout the world because he has expressed the sentiment of millions of people who are so angry at George Bush’s policies”

Critics of Code Pink say the event was more publicity stunt than constructive discussion of the problems facing a post-Bush administration.

Brian Darling of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, says Code Pink may have to change its style once Barack Obama inherits both the White House and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, saying “There is a mainstream left which respectfully discusses what’s happened in Iraq and then there is Code Pink – no where near respectful – and their actions are out of the mainstream.”

The U.S. Secret Service stood by during the protests; however there were no conflicts with authorities and no arrests were made.

Source

Berkeley Code Pink activists support Iraq shoe-throwing reporter

December 17 2008

Code Pink members and supporters hold a “Farewell Kiss, Shoe-in” outside the Marine Recuitment…
Anti-war activists from the group Code Pink gathered at a Marine recruiting station in Berkeley this morning to show solidarity with an Iraqi journalist who threw his shoes at President Bush on Sunday.

Members of the group and others marched around the recruiting station holding shoes in the air to show support for Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zeidi, who hurled two shoes at Bush during a news conference in Baghdad.

In many Arab countries, showing the sole of one’s shoes, much less throwing shoes at another person, is considered extremely disrespectful.

Organizers said their demonstration was to show support for the Iraqi people who have been killed, tortured or maimed and U.S. soldiers who have died since the Bush administration’s invasion of Iraq.

The Code Pink protest didn’t effect operations at the Shattuck Avenue recruiting station, said Marine Corps spokesman Sgt. Matt DeBoard.

“Code Pink has been protesting at Shattuck Square for almost a year now,” he said. ”They don’t bother us and we don’t bother them.”

He repeated the Marine’s contention that their recruiting and military operations help defend Americans right to freedom of speech. “Our position is that we do what we do so that everyone can express their opinion.”

For more than a year, women from CodePink picketed weekly in front of the U.S. Marine recruiting center at 64 Shattuck Square in downtown Berkeley. They say the Marines are not welcome in liberal, anti-war Berkeley and that the office should shut its doors.

In January, the Berkeley City Council got involved when it officially stated that the Marines were “uninvited and unwelcome intruders” and granted CodePink a permit waiver and a free parking space in front of the Marine center for the weekly protests. The move angered people across the country, who flooded City Hall with about 25,000 letters and e-mails.

Source

Protesters shake shoes at US Embassy in London

Dec 17: Peace Activists Take Shoes to White House in Solidarity with Shoe-Throwing Iraqi Journalist

Please also sign Petitions at below link.

Join the Calls to release Iraqi Journalist Muntadhar Al-Zaydi

Repression in the Dominican Republic

Resistance rises in the Dominican Republic

Emmanuel Santos looks at state repression in the Dominican Republic and the spreading resistance.

A march against police repression in San Francisco de Macoris

A march against police repression in San Francisco de Macorís

A SERIES of social struggles in the Dominican Republic are challenging the increasingly repressive regime of President Leonel Fernández.

On October 21, a 48-hour strike to protest the high cost of living and lack of electricity, health care facilities and infrastructure investment paralyzed San Francisco de Macorís, the third largest city in the country. The strike, organized by the Alternative Social Forum (FSA), had a huge economic impact and led to street protests in adjacent towns.

Police SWAT teams were dispatched to put down the strike. Officers shot at protesters indiscriminately, wounding 20 people during violent street clashes. More than 50 people were arrested.

The death of two teenagers shot by police shocked the entire country. Then, four people were wounded when police interrupted the funeral of one of the murdered teens.

But this was not the first time innocent people faced the wrath of the local police. In fact, the police in San Francisco de Macorís have a history of carrying out extrajudicial executions against poor youth. In 2004, Rafael Guillermo Guzmán Fermín, was removed from his post as police commander because of protests.

Fermín had led a death squad that hunted for young people at night. Locals nicknamed his gang of uniformed assassins “Los Cirujanos” (the surgeons) because many of those shot became paraplegic.

But Fermín’s career wasn’t ended after his removal from local office. Last year, Fermín was named chief of police by President Fernández, whose government is instrumental in legitimizing repressive measures to fight crime under the guise of the so-called “war on drugs.” In the meantime, new media revelations implicate upper echelons of the military in the drug trade.

Under a “democratic security policy” put in place with the aid of the U.S. and Colombia, police and undercover units are conducting raids in poor neighborhoods, killing Black youth and criminalizing the poor.

In San Francisco de Macorís, complaints about police brutality had reached a crescendo before the strike October 21. The local governor, a member of the ruling party, was forced to ask government authorities to transfer the entire police department. On October 23, however, a massive demonstration in the city sent a loud message to the government in one of the biggest demonstrations against police brutality in recent memory.

For a moment, the strike had the potential of spreading nationwide. But a section of the FSA, the left-wing Broad Front of Popular Struggle (FALPO), opened a dialogue with the government and negotiated a truce. FALPO’s willingness to make a deal with the government has to do with its recent decision to participate in local elections, leading it to set aside its more radical politics.

Moreover, the government has already had some success in co-opting the opposition. A deal signed between the bosses and the main labor unions freezes salaries for two years.

But agreements and negotiations are unlikely to bring an end to the rising social struggle in the Dominican Republic. So far this year, public sector doctors from the Dominican Medical Association (CMD) have struck ten times to demand a salary increase. Their actions are giving confidence to other union workers and the unorganized.

Fernández is trying to divide the union through both co-optation and violence. On every occasion, CMD marches have been dispersed by tear gas and brutal police force. In early October, SWAT teams and police forcefully removed doctors during a hunger strike in the Health Department headquarters. Additionally, displaced hurricane victims join in with those affected by constant blackouts to organize protests regularly.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

THIS CRACKDOWN is part of broader shift to the right by President Fernández. During the recent presidential campaign, he declared himself the political heir of former right-wing strongman Joaquin Balaguer to appeal to conservative voters, and fill the political vacuum left by Balaguer after his death in 2002.

Between 1966 and 1978, Balaguer’s U.S.-backed reign of terror wiped out the left and the labor movement while opening up the economy to foreign multinationals in an employers’ offensive that continues to this day. And like his predecessors, Fernández embraces anti-Haitian racism and social conservatism to push forward the employer’s offensive.

In August, Fernández announced new cuts in food subsidies and a freeze on infrastructure investment including roads, schools and hospitals so as to reduce the deficit and guarantee the payment of the foreign debt.

As the effects of the world financial crisis destroy jobs and wages, ordinary people in many parts of the country demand solutions to their problems in the form of strikes while Fernández escalates repression in manner not seen since the 1970s. However, this is not having its intended effect and instead, is creating a backlash against his government.

A key focal point of the resistance is the scandal over fake milk used in the government’s school breakfast program. A media uproar pressured the government to transfer the Minister of Education to a less visible cabinet position: that of women’s affairs. The fact that an arrogant, corrupt government official was put in charge of this department highlights the government’s low regard for women’s rights.

But the battle was far from over. Lácteos Dominicanos (Ladom), the milk supplier, sued two veteran independent journalists, Huchi Lora and Nuria Piera, for their role in breaking the milk scandal. A court ruling allowed Ladom’s lawyers to enter the journalists’ office to get unedited footage related to the scandal. This infuriated journalists and left activists who denounced it as nothing more than a typical intimidation tactic to silence independent media.

The court ruling was far from the only attack on the media, however. A new wave of violent attacks against independent journalists erupted after a cameraman was shot in August. Many journalists have become more reluctant to cover politics because of fear of reprisals.

But on September 23, some 300 people marched to protest the court ruling on the milk scandal as well as the climate of fear that has made it more difficult for journalists to do their work in recent months. This was the first time in many years that journalists marched against state repression and censorship.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

WHILE CRACKING down on the press and protesters, the government and the far right has ramped up its attacks on the traditional scapegoat in Dominican politics: Haitian immigrants. Between September 2004 and June 2008, more than 65,000 Haitian immigrants have been deported, all this under Fernández’s watch.

On July 14, Gysselle Baret Reyes, a Dominican married to a Haitian immigrant, was kidnapped by two men and a woman for several hours. During her ordeal, her assailants poured acid on her left arm. They also questioned her about her family and her ties with Emildo Bueno Oguis, a Dominico-Haitian who is conducting a legal battle against the government to demand a birth certificate so he can travel to the U.S. and reunite with his American-born wife.

The attack on Reyes was in retaliation for her appearance on public television where she denounced government authorities for denying birth certificates to her children. This is typical: the Dominican government refuses to grant citizenship rights to thousands of Dominicans of Haitian descent.

Anti-immigrant rhetoric serves to justify border militarization under the banner of fighting the drug trade, terrorism and human trafficking and national sovereignty.

Under the U.S. Merida Initiative, more military aid is on the way to upgrade the Dominican army, which will be to conduct more raids and deportations against Haitian immigrants. Furthermore, meetings between the Dominican government and the Brazilian-dominated UN military occupation forces in Haiti have fostered closer links with the Brazilian military, which is inflicting a brutal repression against followers of former Haitian president Jean Bertrand Aristide.

This attack on immigrants is part of an employers’ offensive that instills fear in Haitian immigrants and prevents them from organizing in unions. Still, immigrants are fighting back. Early this year, 120 immigrants mutinied while on route to Haiti. And immigrant rights marches in the border provinces have taken place.

If President Fernández gets his way, anti-Haitian measures will be enshrined in a proposed new constitution that would grant him additional powers and allow him to be re-elected indefinitely.

The new constitution contemplates, among other things, defining marriage as “a union between a man and a woman” and strengthening what are already harsh anti-abortion laws.

But perhaps the main target of the constitution is Haitians. According to the new constitution, children of undocumented immigrants would not be granted citizenship. No other immigrant group, other than Haitians, has been subject to these segregationist laws.

Even without the constituional changes, Dominico-Haitians constantly find their legal status threatened. Last year, Sonia Pierre, an immigrant rights activist, came under attack by a small right wing party, part of the governing coalition, which tried to seek a court ruling to annul her citizenship under the grounds that her parents were undocumented Haitian immigrants.

But she scored an important victory against the right and the government when activists launched a campaign to defend her, setting a legal precedent that opened the door to future legal battles.

Yet if the Dominican can’t strip Haitians’ rights through legal means, it’s prepared to use violence to intimidate them. Recently, Haitian immigrants were subjected brutal attacks at the same time strikes and protests were taking place in many parts of the country.

In the city of Neyba, two Haitian immigrants were murdered by Dominicans after a Dominican was supposedly killed by a Haitian immigrant. Other violent attacks followed in the town of Guayubín, where 30 houses belonging to Haitian immigrants were burned by a mob after a Haitian was suspected of murdering a Dominican man.

As usual, racist violence against Haitian immigrants remains unpunished because local authorities are behind the attacks. In fact, the mayor of Guayubín is accused of being one of the organizers of the latest violence.

Meanwhile, the mainstream media spread racist ideas about Haitians, who are portrayed as drug dealers, delinquents and rapists. Both politicians and the Catholic Church whip up racist frenzy by blaming Haitian immigrants for crime, “stealing” jobs from Dominicans and spreading disease.

But contrary to mainstream media propaganda, Haitians and Dominican live side by side in poor neighborhoods, and are more integrated than ever before in their workplaces. Though, many ordinary Dominicans embrace racist ideas about Haitians, they’re not responsible for spreading racism and organizing violence against immigrants. The blame for those atrocities rests with the government and the employers.

The more recent attacks led to the deportation of some 500 Haitian immigrants under the pretext of “protecting their lives.” In any case, the same army and police that are responsible for suppressing labor struggles and murdering Black Dominican youth can’t be expected to protect the lives of Haitian immigrants. As of this writing, the town of Navarrete is under military occupation after street protests exploded in protests.

The resistance to Fernández’s repression provides a new opportunity to challenge the government’s divide-and-conquer tactics. Working-class unity between Haitians and Dominicans will be crucial to rebuild the labor movement and the left in order to challenge racist violence and fight for better working conditions and wages for everyone.

Source

‘Bush, Cheney guilty of war crimes’

November 11 2008

Dick Cheney (L) and George W. Bush

Dozens of protesters have gathered outside the Department of Justice to urge indictment and trail of the US President and Vice President.

The activists and legal observers participating in the demonstrations wanted to deliver a letter to Attorney General Michael B. Mukasey, saying outgoing President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney should be taken accountable for treason, murder, bribery and other high crimes.

“This is not about getting them out of office, that’s impeachment. This is about holding them accountable,” said David Swanson, the founder of After Downing Street (ADS).

On the way to the department, the crowd, however, was stopped by a low-level press secretary who pledged he would hand the letter over to the attorney general, Press TV correspondent Jahan Hafez reported.

“We really need to have a medium with him (Michael Mukasey) and we need him to agree to look into the crimes of the Bush administration which are many,” stressed Linda Letendre of the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR).

As Justice Department officials passed the protesters, activists read off the names of those lost in the war.

Founder of After Downing Street (ADS) David Swanson

The protesters then lay on the ground to symbolize those who killed in the so-called war on terror.

“If in fact your elected officials are not held the same standard that the regular citizens are, then you don’t have the standard, you don’t have the rule of law,” one of the activists said.

“That’s extremely dangerous for everybody,” she warned.

“We are directly responsible for those and I would call them murders …Then you have another four million Iraqis who have been displaced from their homes and businesses and their children. There is cholera, there is no water, there is no electricity,” another protester lamented, referring to the dire consequences the Iraqi nation has been suffering after the US-led invasion of the country in 2003.

“There is constant fear and it’s hard to sit still, knowing that we have done this and that we are allowing it to continue,” she added.

The anti-war community says that choosing a new commander-in-chief is not enough and it does not justify thousands of people who have died because of the policies of the Bush administration.

They say the real change comes about when George W. Bush and Dick Cheney are indicated over war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Source

International Commission of Inquiry on Crimes Against Humanity Committed by the Bush Administration


Published in: on November 13, 2008 at 5:49 am  Comments Off on ‘Bush, Cheney guilty of war crimes’  
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Clashes erupt in Montenegro over Kosovo

Oct 14 2008
Clashes erupt in Montenegro over Kosovo

Blasts were heard and ambulances streaming out of the centre of Montenegro’s capital as pro-Serb demonstrators clashed with police during a rally against Montenegro’s recognition of Kosovo’s independence.

Some 10,000 pro-Serbian protesters took to the streets of Podgorica for a rally against the government’s decision last week to recognise the independence of Kosovo, as the opposition harshly criticised the ruling coalition for “stabbing Serbia in the back.”

The protesters chanted “Treason! Treason!” and “Kosovo is Serbia!”, as opposition leaders gave Premier Milo Djukanovic a 48 hour deadline to annul the recognition of Kosovo, or face a referendum on the issue.

Both demonstrators and police officers were among the injured and witnesses saw a number of ambulances taking the wounded to a nearby hospital.

It is not clear what exactly triggered the clashes, but the violence broke out as protesters marched by the government building, reportedly throwing firecrackers and molotov cocktails towards the police cordon which was securing the area.

Demonstrators also demolished the fence around the government building, and police responded by firing the tear gas into the crowd.

In addition, police helicopters hovered over the centre of Podgorica.

Police have made at least a dozen arrests.

Following the violence, protesters dispersed across the capital but sporadic clashes were still being reported.

Miodrag Vukovic, a high-ranking official from the ruling Democratic Party of Socialists, blamed the incidents on the opposition, saying their political rivals have chosen a wrong tactic to express their dissatisfaction.

“This looks like the 1997 attempt to overthrow the government… But Montenegro has matured since then,” Vukovic said.

About a third of Montenegro’s population declare themselves as Serbs, while ethnic Albanians make up around seven per cent of the population of this small coastal republic.

Montenegro was also in a loose federation with Serbia up until a referendum on independence in 2006.
Podgorica recognized Kosovo`s independence on October 9, leading Belgrade to expel Montenegro’s ambassador.

Montenegro’s decision came just a day after the United Nations General Assembly voted in favor of Belgrade’s request for the International Court of Justice to render an opinion on the legality of Kosovo’s unilaterally declared independence in mid-February.

Source

Montenegro opposition to rally over Kosovo

The pro-Serbian opposition in Montenegro will hold a rally in the afternoon of October 13, to urge the government to withdraw its decision to recognize Kosovo’s independence, or call a referendum on the issue.

Podgorica’s decision to recognise Kosovo as an independent state has seriously disrupted relations between the ruling coalition and the opposition, which has also called for early parliamentary elections.

“We want to articulate the popular will on this issue”, the president of the opposition Socialist Peoples Party Srdjan Milic said. He said most Montenegrins do not support the government’s move to recognise Kosovo’s independence.

Despite harsh language between the government and opposition over the weekend, local analysts expect the overall situation to remain calm, and both sides have called on their supporters to remain calm.

About a third of Montenegro’s population declare themselves as Serbs, while ethnic Albanians make up around seven per cent of the population of this small coastal republic.

Montenegro’s police chief, Veselin Veljovic, said that police were prepared to prevent any disturbances during the rally. “The organisers have been warned to respect their obligations and responsibilities regarding public order,” he said.

Podgorica recognised Kosovo’s independence on October 9, leading Belgrade to expel Montenegro’s ambassador.

Montenegro’s decision came just a day after the United Nations General Assembly voted in favor of Belgrade’s request for the International Court of Justice to render an opinion on the legality of Kosovo’s unilaterally declared independence in mid-February.


Serb Paramilitaries on Trial for Kosovo War Crimes
October 6 2008
Belgrade
The trial of the so-called ‘Scorpion’ paramilitary group, who are accused of crimes during the 1998-1999 Kosovo conflict, resumed Monday at Belgrade’s War Crimes Chamber.

Zeljko Djukic, Dragan Medic, Dragan Borojevic and Miodrag Solaja are accused of attacking 19 civilians, all women and children, in Podujevo on March 28, 1999. Fourteen people were killed during the attack although five children survived.

Six other members of the Scorpion Paramilitary have already been tried and sentenced for the same attack the four are standing trial for now.

Scorpion Unit Commander Slobodan Medic was sentenced to 20 years in prison, member Sasa Cvijetin was sentenced to 20 years behind bars, Pera Petrasevic received 13 years, Branislav Medic’s jail term was reduced from 20 to 15 years, Aleksandar Vukov was cleared of all charges and Aleksandar Medic, who was originally sentenced to five years, was granted a retrial by the court.
Source

Olli Rehn

Olli Rehn
October 16 2008
Brussels _ The EU has urged Serbian officials to be constructive over Kosovo, especially in regards to the deployment of the bloc’s EULEX law and order mission.

“It is important that we all, including the Serbian government, work towards making EULEX’s deployment a success, and in this regard we expect a constructive approach”, said the bloc’s Enlargement Commissioner, Olli Rehn.

“After the vote at the United Nations General Assembly, the result of which was no drama or no surprise, it is now important that we all work in order to ensure overall regional stability and the enhancement of rule of law in Kosovo and elsewhere in the region,” he added.

This was the commissioner’s response to the latest message from Serbian President Boris Tadic that they would cooperate with the mission but only under certain conditions.

In the interview for Belgrade daily Vecernje Novosti, Tadic emphasised that Belgrade would condition the European mission’s presence in Kosovo on a green light from the UN Security Council, ask the current United Nations Mission to retain its neutral stance towards the status of Serbia’s former province and, last but not least, call for plans to implement the blueprint for Kosovo’s independence devised by former UN envoy and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Martti Ahtisaari, to be dropped.

Rehn also reminded Serbia’s politicians that good neighbourly relations are of outmost importance under a EU pre-membership deal called the Stabilisation and Association Agreement, which Belgrade signed with Brussels at the end of April.

“We underline the importance of overall regional stability, and for that it is important that Serbia has a constructive approach to the Kosovo issue and the deployment of the EULEX mission which aims to ensure stability in Kosovo and the region, and citizens rights and rule of law for all the citizens of Kosovo,” Rehn said in Brussels.

Rehn earlier met Serbian deputy prime minister Mladjan Dinkic on Thursday to whom he congratulated the decision of the government to unilaterally start the implementation of trade-related parts of the Stabilisation and Association Agreement.

According to Rehn, this will be very useful in building a convincing track record when Serbia gets EU candidate status.

October 16 2008

Belgrade _ Serbia’s President Boris Tadic says a compromise with Brussels is possible over the deployment of the European Union’s new law-and-order mission to Kosovo.

Tadic said Belgrade wants to find a compromise to the deployment of the 2,200-strong European Union mission to Kosovo, known as EULEX but with blessing of the United Nations Security Council.

The world’s top security body remains divided on the issue since veto-wielding member Russia, strongly backs Serbia’s territorial integrity and has previously echoed Belgrade’s concerns that EULEX seeks to formalise Kosovo’s independence.

“We are working on that in all international forums, with the UN Security Council and the EU, with officials from Russia and the United States, with everyone who is vitally important in the future of Kosovo and Serbia,” Tadic told Belgrade daily Vecernje Novosti.

However Tadic emphasised that Belgrade would condition the European mission’s presence in Kosovo on a green light from the UN Security Council, ask the current United Nations Mission to retain its neutral stance towards the status of Serbia’s former province and, last but not least, call for plans to implement the blueprint for Kosovo’s independence devised by former UN envoy and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Martti Ahtisarri, to be dropped.

“Anyone who finds fault with these principles has a problem with logic. There are political parties that are trying to fool Serbian citizens and ‘guarantee’ that EULEX will implement independence in Kosovo. We are going to fight to make sure that does not happen,” Tadic said.

The move towards a compromise between Belgrade and Brussels was also signalled by the EU’s special representative in Kosovo, Pieter Feith, who said that “recent consultations” between Serbia, the EU and New York opened the possibility for a widely acceptable solution for EULEX.

“There is a possibility that consultations between Belgrade, the EU and New York result with some kind of solution and the UN’s authorisation for EULEX. But I believe there is no real need for that,” Feith said, adding that the EU looks forward to cooperation with Belgrade on the matter soon.

The positive signals followed warnings from international think-tanks such as the International Crisis Group that divisions between Kosovo’s ethnic Albanian majority and some 100,000 remaining Serbs have widened following Kosovo’s unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia on February 17.

The United Nations Mission in Kosovo, UNMIK, which has administered Kosovo since the end of the 1998-1999 conflict between Serb forces and ethnic Albanians, has been wrapping up its mission under a procedure it calls ‘reconfiguration.’

EULEX is due to become the main international body in Kosovo, although its powers will be largely supervisory – particularly relating to the fields of policing and the judiciary.

But EULEX’s ability to fully deploy some eight months after Brussels okayed its biggest ever security and defence policy operation has given western powers cause for concern.

Critically it lacks a mandate from the UN Security Council since Russia has vowed to block any changes to Kosovo’s status which do not have approval from Serbia.

Belgrade and Moscow have also used this shortcoming to argue Kosovo’s independence is in fact illegal under international law.

Adding to EULEX’s woes is the question of whether it could ever deploy across the whole territory of Kosovo.

Kosovo Serbs, particularly those living north of the River Ibar, where they make up a majority, have so far defied Kosovo’s independence thanks to political and financial assistance from Belgrade.

They are also likely to put up stiff resistance against the EULEX mission.

“UNMIK remains our only legitimate partner in Kosovo,” Serbia’s Minister for Kosovo Goran Bogdanovic said, rejecting the EU’s announcements that its mission will be fully operational by December on the whole territory of Kosovo.

The UN mission has tried to take up Serbia’s concerns by opening up direct negotiations on local governance in Serb-dominated areas of Kosovo.

Such talks are to focus on areas such as police, courts and customs but little progress has been made so far.

Not only have the areas of dispute proved too complex for both sides to address but Kosovo’s ethnic Albanian leaders have also vented their frustration at being left out of the talks, expressed in their arguments that Kosovo’s sovereignty ‘cannot be compromised.’
Rehn also reminded Serbia’s politicians that good neighbourly relations are of outmost importance under a EU pre-membership deal called the Stabilisation and Association Agreement, which Belgrade signed with Brussels at the end of April.

“We underline the importance of overall regional stability, and for that it is important that Serbia has a constructive approach to the Kosovo issue and the deployment of the EULEX mission which aims to ensure stability in Kosovo and the region, and citizens rights and rule of law for all the citizens of Kosovo,” Rehn said in Brussels.

Rehn earlier met Serbian deputy prime minister Mladjan Dinkic on Thursday to whom he congratulated the decision of the government to unilaterally start the implementation of trade-related parts of the Stabilisation and Association Agreement.


October 16 2008 Belgrade _ Serbia’s government has unanimously backed a move to begin implementing reforms outlined in a key pre-membership deal with the EU despite the bloc having frozen the agreement.

Serbia hopes that by unilaterally taking up the key reforms prescribed in the Stabilisation and Association Agreement, Belgrade will be able to become a European Union candidate once the deal is unfrozen.

“The main goal is to shorten the time between implementation of the agreement and Serbian candidature for EU membership,” Premier Mirko Cvetkovic said after the open session of the Serbian government.

The parts of the key agreement with the EU will be implemented immediately but the rest of package, including new, lower custom taxes on the import of cars, will come into force from January, Serbian officials said earlier.

European officials have urged Serbia to begin implementing the deal unilaterally, despite the fact that there has been no EU consensus on backing Belgrade’s drive for membership.

Only one country, the Netherlands, has opposed ratification of the interim trade agreement with Belgrade.

The main reason behind such a stance according to the Dutch Foreign Minister Maxime Verhagen, was Belgrade’s failure to arrest and extradite to The Hague the former military chief of Bosnian Serbs, Ratko Mladic, wanted for genocide and war crimes committed during the 1992-1995 conflict.

Serbia’s pro-European government has made EU integration its key priority. EU officials earlier signalled that Serbia could achieve candidate status next year.

When the Serbian parliament ratified the Stabilisation and Association Agreement last month, the hardline opposition Radical Party, which has traditionally opposed EU membership, abstained from voting, a move which may signal the emergence of a greater national consensus on Serbia’s European objectives.