France: Riot police storm The Jungle Refugee Camp at Calais,

September 22, 2009

These are refugees from Iraq and Afghanistan who traveled to Calais, hoping they could make it to Britain.

278 people have  been detained by the French police, 132  are children.

This is the day they destroy the  Calais refugee camp known as the Jungle.   French riot police were apparently armed with flamethrowers, stun guns and tear gas.

At 7.40 am, dozens of vans accompanied by bulldozers began circling the camp.

Aproximatly 500 officers were at the site.

Camp refugees, many of whom were children, were dragged away by police officers and put into waiting buses. Others were escorted out.

Refugees

As I was wandering around I noticed how many didn’t want these people in their country. Not naming names or anything. When ‘I first noticed the story, I went all over.

These people have come from war torn countries. There are a few million displaced civilians because of the Iraq war and Afghanistan..

With every war there are always refugees. Now what is also interesting many of these same folks, who were complaining about the refugees were supportive of  the wars.

Now however because there is a refugee problem, they don’t want to help them.

Well if you don’t want refugees don’t start wars.

Many of the children may be orphans.  They can’t send children back to Afghanistan  at this point in time.  Many people thought they should be just shipped back.

There really may not be much for them to go back to and if their parents have been killed there is even less reason for them to go back.

We are not helping them. We are doing more harm then good.

Then there is the DU and the radiation from the Bunker Busters.

Well more will get cancer and die.

It will also affect the soldiers who are in those areas.

I think it is time to face those facts.

In Afghanistan  53 %  are living in poverty and rising each year.

Unemployment has risen to 40% way up from 2000 when it was only 8%.

They have about 8,000 dead and over 59,000 who were injured.

They also have a heroin problem again. The Taliban as awful as they may be, had destroyed all the poppy fields.

Now Iran and Iraq have a heroin problem. Under Saddam heroin was never a problem in Iraq.

The heroin is now being shipped out to North America and European countries.  So now they have a heroin problem too.

Now folks are complaining about the refugees.

Well what did they expect?

Every war creates millions of refugees.

Remembering all the other wars around the world that is a fact of life.

My heart goes out to them.They have suffered so much tragedy and loss.

Arial view of camp

This the areal View of the Camp. Not a very special place, but to the refugees it was home and it was safe.  Safer then the war zones they came from.

police

refugee arrested

Refugee arrested

refugee 7

refugee 6

Refugee 5

refugee camp 4

refugee camp 3

refugee camp 2

camp 10

What will happen to them now is unknown. They didn’t start the wars they are the victims of it.

Now they have been arrested by the very people who they thought might help them.

Seems no matter where they go they are not welcome.

Nato however had no problem invading their countries.

Nato had no problem destroying their homes and their lives.

They had no problem polluting their homeland with DU and Radiation from Bunker Busters.

No problem bombing their homes.

No problem killing their friends and realtives.

No problem at all.

They ran away from their home land, because they couldn’t take the wars anymore. They want and need to feel safe. Well I guess they will be safe in prison.

No body wants them. How shameful this is.

Especially for the children.

(Afghanistan 5) A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words

Victims’ families tell their stories following Nato airstrike in Afghanistan

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Published in: on September 22, 2009 at 2:09 pm  Comments Off on France: Riot police storm The Jungle Refugee Camp at Calais,  
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Not one penny has reached Gaza to rebuild

Not one penny has reached Gaza
Omar Karmi , Foreign Correspondent

August 31. 2009

Many structures in Gaza, such as the parliament building, are still in rubble.

JERUSALEM // It has been six months since the international community pledged nearly US$5 billion (Dh18bn) in aid to the Palestinian people, chiefly for the reconstruction of the Gaza Strip after Israel’s devastating offensive there this year.

None of this aid has reached Gaza and no reconstruction has started.

Although Israel is slowly easing its restrictions on the flow of basic humanitarian goods to Gaza, including food and medicine, construction materials remain prohibited from entering, institutions and homes still lie in rubble, and critically needed projects to repair and upgrade Gaza’s power plant and tottering sewage network lie dormant.

The situation is frustrating to development agencies and experts. Two weeks ago, the UN was forced to issue another emergency appeal for funds for Gazans. The UN’s Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), which provides aid and education to Palestinian refugees, decried the condition of Gaza’s refugees as “shameful”. Numbering one million, refugees make up about 70 per cent of the total population in Gaza; and UNRWA asked for $181 million to help it through the rest of the year in a special Ramadan appeal.

Of the billions of dollars pledged for reconstruction by the international community, UNRWA noted in a press release on August 17, “not one penny” has reached Gaza, and reconstruction has proven to be a “mirage”. The humanitarian situation in Gaza, according to the UN, “remains precarious”.

That such serious humanitarian disasters as a cholera epidemic did not emerge in Gaza, said William Corcoran, the president of the American Near East Refugee Aid agency, (Anera) is partly down to “dumb luck”.

“We expected more serious health scares but thankfully they haven’t occurred,” Mr Corcoran said in an interview last week. “This is partly because sewage pipes have not yet burst into the streets. But they are at the stage where that can happen at any moment.”

In Gaza, Anera is a partner to USAID, the official US aid agency, and is supposed to repair and upgrade most of Gaza’s aged and faulty sewage system. That project – like all the projects, including construction of a seaport and the reopening of the airport, agreed to in the US-brokered 2005 Agreement on Movement and Access – has yet to get off the ground.

Mr Corcoran was keen to highlight the projects Anera has been able to implement in Gaza, including food and medicine deliveries, a programme to provide fresh milk to Gazan preschoolers and the reconstruction of 18 preschools using materials recycled from the destruction wrought in the Gaza war, but he admitted to frustration at the kind of projects Anera is now pursuing.

In the West Bank, he said, Anera helped establish four IT institutes affiliated to four different universities. In Gaza, while plans have been laid for a similar project, Anera’s newest project involved buying shoes for children. “We are forced to lower our expectations for what we can do.”

At heart, the problem is political. The expertise is there, whether with such agencies as the UN and Anera, or with local NGOs affiliated to those international bodies. The money has been pledged even if it has yet to be delivered. The statement from UNRWA noted that, pledges apart, the largest Arab donation to date had been a $34m contribution from the emir of Kuwait.

But what Mr Corcoran calls the “political stalemate” – whether in international efforts to pressure Israel to lift its siege on Gaza, which has been in place for more than two years, or in Palestinian reconciliation efforts – has stymied efforts to begin reconstruction in Gaza.

The latter is crucial in establishing a mechanism for distributing aid to Gaza. International sanctions on official contacts with Hamas tie the hands of agencies dealing with Gaza authorities. International funding, under the current proscriptions, cannot end up in the hands of Hamas, and even a clear commitment by Hamas, offered repeatedly over the past months, will not dissuade the international community from this stance.

The result is that international aid efforts are being channelled through the Palestinian Authority led by Mahmoud Abbas. As emphasised yesterday by Nabil Shaath, a senior aide to Mr Abbas, in a press conference in Ramallah, there will be no reconstruction of the Gaza Strip until there is a unity agreement between Fatah and Hamas.

Even then, however, the international community must still pressure Israel to lift the siege, aid organisations said. The destruction of the war in January aside, the greatest damage has been done not by bombs but by isolation. Unable to rebuild or improve, two years of sanctions have undermined the economy and infrastructure. According to a July survey by the Palestine Trade Centre, 95 per cent of industries in Gaza have had to shut as a result of sanctions and 120,000 private sector employees have been laid off.

Source

This is a crime. There is no excuse. The Citizens of Gaza need help.

IOF willfully kill a Palestinian child in al-Jalazoun refugee camp, north of Ramallah

PA minister accuses Israel of neglecting prisoners’ health

Israel’s Dirty Nuclear Secrets, Human Experiments  and WMD

Indexed List of all Stories in Archives

Top Ten Myths About Iraq, 2008

By Juan Cole
December 26, 2008

1. Iraqis are safer because of Bush’s War. In fact, conditions of insecurity have helped created both an internal and external refugee problem:

‘ At least 4.2 million Iraqis were displaced. These included 2.2 million who were displaced within Iraq and some 2 million refugees, mostly in Syria (around 1.4 million) and Jordan (around half a million). In the last months of the year both these neighbouring states, struggling to meet the health, education and other needs of the Iraqi refugees already present, introduced visa requirements that impeded the entry of Iraqis seeking refuge. Within Iraq, most governorates barred entry to Iraqis fleeing sectarian violence elsewhere.’

2. Large numbers of Iraqis in exile abroad have returned. In fact, no great number have returned, and more Iraqis may still be leaving to Syria than returning.

3. Iraqis are materially better off because of Bush’s war. In fact, A million Iraqis are “food insecure” and another 6 million need UN food rations to survive. Oxfam estimated in summer, 2007, that 28% of Iraqi children are malnourished.

4. The Bush administration scored a major victory with its Status of Forces Agreement. In fact, The Iraqis forced on Bush an agreement that the US would withdraw combat troops from Iraqi cities by July, 2009,and would completely withdraw from the Country by the end of 2011. The Bush administration had wanted 58 long-term bases, and the authority to arrest Iraqis at will and to launch military operations unilaterally.

5. Minorities in Iraq are safer since Bush’s invasion. In fact, there have in 2008 been significant attacks on and displacement of Iraqi Christians from Mosul. In early January of 2008, guerrillas bombed churches in Mosul, wounding a number of persons. More recently, some 13,000 Christians have had to flee Mosul because of violence.

6. The sole explanation for the fall in the monthly death rate for Iraqi civilians was the troop excalation or surge of 30,000 extra US troops in 2007. In fact, troop levels had been that high before without major effect. The US military did good counter-insurgency in 2007. The major reason for the fall in the death toll, however, was that the Shiites won the war for Baghdad, ethnically cleansing hundreds of thousands of Sunnis from the capital, and turning it into a city with a Shiite majority of 75 to 80 percent. (When Bush invaded, Baghdad was about 50/50 Sunni and Shiite). The high death tolls in 2006 and 2007 were a by-product of this massive ethnic cleansing campaign. Now, a Shiite militiaman in Baghdad would have to drive for a while to find a Sunni Arab to kill.

7. John McCain alleged that if the US left Iraq, it would be promptly taken over by al-Qaeda. In fact, there are few followers of Usamah Bin Laden in Iraq. The fundamentalist extremists, if that is what McCain meant, are not supported by most Sunni Arabs. They are supported by no Shiites (60% of Iraq) or Kurds (20% of Iraq), and are hated by Iran, Syria, Turkey, and Jordan, who would never allow such a takeover.

8. The Iraq War made the world safer from terrorism. In fact, Iraq has become a major training ground for extremists and is implicated in the major bombings in Madrid, London, and Glasgow.

9. Bush went to war in Iraq because he was given bad intelligence about Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction capabilities. In fact, the State Department’s Intelligence & Research (I & R) division cast doubt on the alarmist WMD stories that Bush/Cheney put about. The CIA refused to sign off on the inclusion of the Niger uranium lie in the State of the Union address, which made Bush source it to the British MI6 instead. The Downing Street Memo revealed that Bush fixed the intelligence around the policy. Bush sought to get up a provocation such as a false flag attack on UN planes so as to blame it on Iraq. And UN weapons inspectors in Feb.-Mar. of 2003 examined 100 of 600 suspected weapons sites and found nothing; Bush’s response was to pull them out and go to war.

10. Douglas Feith and other Neoconservatives didn’t really want a war with Iraq (!). Yeah, that was why they demanded war on Iraq with their 1996 white paper for Bibi Netanyahu and again in their 1998 Project for a New American Century letter to Clinton, where they explicitly called for military action. The Neoconservatives are notorious liars and by the time they get through with rewriting history, they will be a combination of Gandhi and Mother Teresa and the Iraq War will be Bill Clinton’s fault. The only thing is, I think people are wise to them by now. Being a liar can actually get you somewhere. Being a notorious liar is a disadvantage if what you want to is get people to listen to you and act on your advice. I say, Never Again.

See also my article in The Nation, “Iraq: The Necessary Withdrawal,” and this piece in the Toronto Star.

Juan Cole is President of the Global Americana Institute – Visit his website http://www.juancole.com/

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Published in: on December 27, 2008 at 5:37 am  Comments Off on Top Ten Myths About Iraq, 2008  
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